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Analysis and comments on Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

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Comment 16 of 1056, added on December 7th, 2004 at 1:05 PM.

THIS IS THE BEST POEM HE HAS EVER MADE


RODNEY MOORE from United States
Comment 15 of 1056, added on December 6th, 2004 at 8:51 PM.

This is my altime favorite Frost poem. I never fully understood it until
7th grade when I read "The Wind Blows Backwards". In that book, it tells
of a senoir's view on the poem. He explains how each line tells of some
deep meaning to the narrator. I am in the process of writing an analysis
on the poem for my advanced 10 english class and have greatly benifited
from the comments expressed from this website.
Sara

Sara from United States
Comment 14 of 1056, added on December 6th, 2004 at 4:35 PM.

This poem is very sweet and I love it to death this is one of his best
poems that I ever read all of them are good but I just love this one to
death.

Berta from United States
Comment 13 of 1056, added on November 29th, 2004 at 8:33 PM.

The deep and dark woods, without a house around, represent to me Frost's
hidden, buried, denied places which contain his unaccessed fear. They are
owned by a man in the village, representing the predominant part of
ourselves living a busy, non-woods life, separate from, denying his
"woods". The horse symbolizing the ego, is puzzled why he is making a stop
where there is no house (construct of the mind), and wants Frost get away
from there, away from his fear. "Promises to keep" are his duties, not to
himself, but keeping others happy i.e. not being true to himself, and
"Miles to go before I sleep" represents the self-imposed trap he feels
himself in, in continual doing for others, before he can have time to
himself, only when he is asleep, which is a nice matephor for still not
going to the woods. The draw he feels, to somehow pay homage to the cold,
lonely, dark "woods" is why it speaks to all of us. Humankind has
undiscovered, unclaimed huge aspects of ourselves on a deep soul level and
the soul knows. It's pull is palpable and beckons us inward, away from
doing for others, living up to other's expectations, with the sounds of its
gentle calling - the sweep of easy wind and downy flake.


Maurice Goodwin from Canada
Comment 12 of 1056, added on November 25th, 2004 at 5:47 PM.

I, too, have heard the debate that this poem was about suicide. Frost loves
to use seasons in his poems, and the fact that it's winter in this poem
certainly evokes the idea of death, or near death. Also, it takes place at
night, in the dark, another image of death. The narrator is alone, except
for the horse, which also can evoke a death image. If it isn't about
suicide, then it certain is about a longing for rest, a certain weariness
of life.

Now that I am at a stage of life where I also have promises to keep, I can
relate to this poem more than ever. It is one of my favorite. Great stuff.

Susan from Japan
Comment 11 of 1056, added on November 23rd, 2004 at 2:15 PM.

This is my all time favorite poem. It gave me a feel of inspiration and
hope. The determination to keep going because everything in life is
beautiful.

tink from Honduras
Comment 10 of 1056, added on November 17th, 2004 at 1:47 AM.

Stopping By The Woods On A Snowy Evening. My Father was a country doctor
in the days when doctors were doctors. He has just gone out to a family's
home and delivered life. He is returning home, and he pauses to observe
the earth rebirth herself.

James Preston Evans from United States
Comment 9 of 1056, added on November 8th, 2004 at 7:29 PM.

There has been a lot of debate as to whether this poem is a contemplation
of suicide. Frost himself denied this, but the language is evocative.

One note I've never seen on this poem - "Whose woods these are, I think I
know. His house is in the village; though..."
There is one house you will find in the heart of every New England village.
It is the church.


Tom Faris from United States
Comment 8 of 1056, added on November 8th, 2004 at 12:19 PM.

This is a beautiful poem with stunning and touching imagery. All of Frost's
poems are beautiful without having a grandiloquent style but pretty and
heartfelt.

Shuchita from India
Comment 7 of 1056, added on November 2nd, 2004 at 12:17 PM.

The simplicity of the scene is what makes the poem so attractive. The
rhythm makes it a wonderful piece to read. Though it may not seem to have
much depth, it will come across as a truly insightful and beautiful poem
after some analyzation.

Overall, it rocks!!

~ E. Ronaldo

Mundogirl from Portugal

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Information about Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: 24. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
Volume: New Hampshire
Year: 1923
Added: Feb 1 2004
Viewed: 2438 times
Poem of the Day: Jun 26 2000


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