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Analysis and comments on Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

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Comment 56 of 1056, added on May 23rd, 2005 at 7:33 PM.

Having lived in New Hampshire, I can see where his feelings are coming
from. Enjoying nature is not very common, and this poem paints an image in
my mind of peacefulness, and serenity. Robert Frost enjoyed the simpler
things in life, like a light snowfall just as the sun sets behind the
mountains, and the woods take on a beautiful look, with the bright
whiteness of the snow contrasting with the dark night sky, creating a calm
and subtle gray atmosphere. Yet at the same time, he is not in complete
solitude, for there is a house nearby with light shining from it, showing
warmth close by as a friendly reminder that he is not far from comfort, but
far enough away from people to enjoy nature all by his lonesome self. Maybe
he was contemplating suicide, as many people believe, but I solely believe
he was dreaming of a lifetime of serenity away from it all yet in only one
moments time, and as his dream fades away he is reminded of the long
journey of life ahead of him before he reaches his tranquil paradise.

Zac from United States
Comment 55 of 1056, added on May 12th, 2005 at 9:10 PM.

OK your all crack heads come on its so easy to see the truth of what this
poem is really about.... He obvously playes online games and pownes all the
vech lamers. He then talks about how he is a great sniper In planetside ans
says how you all should kill yourselves now come on am I right or what !!:)

William The great from United States
Comment 54 of 1056, added on May 4th, 2005 at 1:03 PM.

kool! This poem is alright. I never thought that this poem could be about
suiside! F deadly!

Robert Frost himself! from Zimbabwe
Comment 53 of 1056, added on May 3rd, 2005 at 1:53 PM.

there is totally a subtle tone of suicidal contemplation. if one reads
frost's other work, one will see how deep his poems are. why would he
suddenly take to writing about winter landscapes, especially during a low
point in his life? there is definatly something more in this poem.

Zera from Portugal
Comment 52 of 1056, added on May 3rd, 2005 at 12:11 PM.

I can see the contemplation of suicide. How death would be like "The woods
are lovely, dark and deep" He is describing a what a low point in life he
is at with "The darkest evening of the year". He changes his mind by saying
"But I have promises to keep" He realizes his obligations are more
important. He chooses life. Which leads to these lines "And miles to go
before I sleep" He decides to keep on living.

Kenneth from United States
Comment 51 of 1056, added on May 2nd, 2005 at 2:46 PM.

I love this pome it is cute and it gives a good fealing when you read it.
Robert Frost is a very talinted person I love reading his work.

Amanda from United States
Comment 50 of 1056, added on April 29th, 2005 at 8:22 AM.

This oem is a great piece of work. I like reading Robert Frost Poems
because you can get so many things out of them. Isn't that what poetry is
about though? What a poem means is what it means ot you. On that note, I
agree with all of your suggestions! I think everyone has great ideas. In
fact I have my own meaning form the poem. It may not be right but I'll
state it anyway. OK, obviously form the first stanza, the narrator knows
who these woods belong to a and where this person lives.From the second and
third stanza, you can see that the horse is kinda funny about stopping with
no sign of civilization around. Which seems kind of awkward since most
places in the old time were uncivilized.From the last stanza you can tell
this this poem is kinda dark.Obviously he has things to do but it kinda
seems strange how he states it.So, with all of that, I think , now its just
my opinion, I think the narrator is death.

Bo Pate from United States
Comment 49 of 1056, added on April 26th, 2005 at 8:02 PM.

its crap!!!! nah but seriously I really like this poem and I defenitely do
not think it is about suicide.

alfreido from Bulgaria
Comment 48 of 1056, added on April 24th, 2005 at 10:41 AM.

I think this poem is just lovely- and I enjoyed reading all the analysises
on this site... look here, though, and click on the picture to watch a
video: http://www.favoritepoem.org/thevideos/alpaugh.html

Tara from United States
Comment 47 of 1056, added on April 13th, 2005 at 3:20 PM.

I'm always suprised by people who see Robert Frost poems as complicated
metaphors of life, and even more suprised when they suggest that elements
of the poem are in fact imaginary. I was fortunate to live in Rural
Vermont for a year some thiry years ago and I had many moments of
breathtaking ephinany as the light and landscape cast up moments of
esquisite beauty. Who hasn't stood in amazement watching a particularly
beautiful snowfall? I can just picture Mr. Frost driving home in his
cutter as evening falls, rounding a gentle bend beside a small lake and
suddenly he stops, astonished at the light and dark of the woods and the
gentle sound of the breeze bourne snow. His horse would shake his bells and
Frost is aware of what the horse thinks; and haven't we all reluctantly
turned away from some beautiful natural phenomenum because we have things
to attend to?

Bob Mumford from Canada

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Information about Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: 24. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
Volume: New Hampshire
Year: 1923
Added: Feb 1 2004
Viewed: 2175 times
Poem of the Day: Jun 26 2000


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