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Analysis and comments on Nothing Gold Can Stay by Robert Frost

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Comment 299 of 509, added on May 24th, 2007 at 9:58 PM.

This poem tells me quite a bit. It shows us how quickly good things and
chances fade away. We have to value what we have. We should also treasure
our youth and childhood. After all, no one really appreciates anything
until it is completely gone.

Tara Alizadeh from United States
Comment 298 of 509, added on May 24th, 2007 at 8:45 PM.

The poem "Nothing Gold Can Stay", by Robert Frost shows me an example of
growing up. It also proves a point that all good things come to an end. In
this poem i believe Frost is saying to be happy and live life to the
fullest because one day you won't have it anymore.

Ryan Arbues from United States
Comment 297 of 509, added on May 25th, 2007 at 2:23 AM.

"Nothing Gold can Stay" by Robert Frost has a lot to say. True, Frost talks
about the little pleasures in life but he also talks about us getting ahead
of ourselves. Moving onto new things the second they come along. He says,
"Her early leaf's a flower;" then two stanzas down says, "Then leaf
subsides to leaf". A leaf at first bloom is everything. It's gold. As soon
as the flowers bud the leaf is just a leaf. This kind of reminds me of
technology in our days. A new computer or digital camera comes out...a year
or so later it's considered old school. Frost attempts to remind us that
those things that may seem old are still imortant. Don't forget to stop and
appreciate them.

Ashley Dien from United States
Comment 296 of 509, added on May 24th, 2007 at 2:18 AM.

Things donít last in this world. We should value the things that matter to
us and cherish it. In this poem the flower symbolizes the beauty around us,
like our family and friends. We should remember that there will be a time
that all the things we value will cease and no longer will be around us. In
conclusion let us be someone who values time for our family and friends.

Jan from United States
Comment 295 of 509, added on May 24th, 2007 at 1:59 AM.

This poem has a lot of ruth to it. I feel that it is trying to protray
that all things should not be taken for granted. Not everything is going
to stay, so we should enjoy them while we can. We should embass the small
little pleasures that come nad go through life.

alyssa Sasaki from United States
Comment 294 of 509, added on May 24th, 2007 at 12:52 AM.

The poem "Nothing Gold Can Stay", by Robert Frost, is very true. This poem
shows you how everything in this life, even life itself comes to an end. I
think this can symbolize a road on life; on how a little decision can
simply change your whole life. Sometime we as teenagers, take the wrong
path but that is just life. You live and you learn.

Johanna Arroyo from United States
Comment 293 of 509, added on May 23rd, 2007 at 8:31 PM.

This poem is written by Robert Frost. Robert Frost relates it to everyday
life with humans, even though it is written about a flower. He states that
nothing gold can stay, which is true nothing lasts forever. That's why you
have to cherish every moment that you have on this earth whether it is with
someone you love or with your friends. You have appreciate everything you
have and every second that you have. This reminded me of Gatsby from The
Great Gatsby, he tried everything that he could just to be with Daisy even
though it might just be for just an hour.

Klara Hardin from United States
Comment 292 of 509, added on May 23rd, 2007 at 6:50 PM.

This poem by Robert Frost is a well written piece of literature that
illustrates how a flower and beauty is valuable but won't last forever. Its
short but straight forward. It also really touches your heart and soul with
his soft rhyme scheme. You couldn't ask for a better poem.I give this poem
four stars.

Daynon turner from United States
Comment 291 of 509, added on May 22nd, 2007 at 10:41 PM.

This poem reminds us that the wonderful, youthful elements of our lives
last only for a short time. While we have them, they are golden.
Therefore, we must appreciate what we've been given and see the beauty
before us each day, knowing it will not last forever. Our lives as human
beings are also short-lived in the overall scheme of things...but that's
okay...it's the way life is.

Kathy from United States
Comment 290 of 509, added on May 22nd, 2007 at 12:46 AM.

I belive that this poem means to value the same treasures in life. For the
little gifts do not last forever, so we should cherish them.

alyssa Sasaki from United States

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Information about Nothing Gold Can Stay

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: 21. Nothing Gold Can Stay
Volume: New Hampshire
Year: 1923
Added: Feb 1 2004
Viewed: 855 times
Poem of the Day: Mar 12 2004


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