Poets | Bookstore | Poem of the Day | Top 40 | Search | Comments | Privacy
April 20th, 2014 - we have 234 poets, 8,025 poems and 103,948 comments.
Analysis and comments on Fire and Ice by Robert Frost

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 [16] 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27

Comment 111 of 261, added on April 10th, 2006 at 9:10 PM.

From reading this poem, I extrapolate that Robert may be:
A) Possibly just playing 'see what the losers can come up with'
-Some scholars have stated that this may be a very straight-forward side
of robert that we are not used to reading.
B) Could be giving a soft opinion on literally how the world will end.
-Many people infer that Robert is expressing that he believes the world
will end in rage and hatred, (not lust, as many people may argue! From what
I understand, lust is usually means sexual desire).
C)Telling us how the world does infact end, and how, since he does know
God, Allah, Budda, (you know the whole gang of almighty immortals)
D) Using the end of the world to relate to something smaller
_-My cool english teacher has told us this is called a Homeric Similie,
assuming Robert likes to use some of Homer's writing techniques.
E) I DONT KNOW! I am only 14.
F) Wilson High is pretty kool, and you know it.....Go Bruins (We rock and
you know it)! :P





Alison from United States
Comment 110 of 261, added on April 5th, 2006 at 9:05 AM.

This poem has two meanings (to my understanding). How the world will end
and how relationships conflict with each other. The more obvious and clear
cut meaning is how the world will end. Will it end in a supernova (fire)
or will the sun eventually run out of fuel (ice). With his last two
stanza’s “Is also great” and “would suffice”, I believe Frost thinks that
death by fire would be a worse fate than ending the world with ice

Willie from United States
Comment 109 of 261, added on April 4th, 2006 at 5:37 PM.

i really like this poem. i think it is about how everything has to end
sometime, be it the world or a relationship or anything. but its better to
have loved something while you had it rather than losing it before you even
had a chance to get to know it. and if you did have the chance to get to
know it first, then you would be able to make the choice about how it will
end. maybe robert frost is talking about past relationships where he has
loved someone or something so much that he has been able to make some sort
of a decision about how it will end. perhaps he was in a close relationship
with a nother person and s/he was going to die. so he would have the
decision whether he wanted to say good bye to her and be with her until the
last minute, or say goodbye in advance so she wouldn't have to see him cry.
that is a very ditailed example but i think it fits. i really liked this
poem and i'm using it in an essay i am writing right now!

reader from United States
Comment 108 of 261, added on April 3rd, 2006 at 9:56 PM.

Ok u guys do no that the world isnt like ACTUALLY gonna end that way. Its
gonna go when the sun blows up. or something. Anyway but I really do like
this poem, except i don't like the "would suffice" part at the end of it.
but if the world were gonna end in fire or ice i'd say fire cuz i know more
desire than hate. maybe cuz nobody could ever hate me ha ha! Adios amigas

El from United States
Comment 107 of 261, added on March 30th, 2006 at 10:50 AM.

This poem was wonderfull. It was his Best poem of all time. Very touching.

kiki from United States
Comment 106 of 261, added on March 26th, 2006 at 3:20 PM.

I truley believe this poets words hold great truth... what is the point in
loving if it all will just perish because true happines in love does not
exsist. It is better not to love at all (end in ice) then to be hurt twice
(perish twice) and end in hatered (fire) because your broken soul will only
lead to the original state one should have belived in, in the first place.
youll become cold and bitter... might as well be cold and bitter in the
first place then experience a dreadful feeling and then end cold hearted.

Red06chik from United States
Comment 105 of 261, added on March 21st, 2006 at 10:17 PM.

I love this poem it is my favorite poem of all time. It's the best poem
ever.

ME from United States
Comment 104 of 261, added on March 21st, 2006 at 3:52 PM.

it could be his response to the great war a.k.a. WWI. "The world will end
in fire" fire could represent the war and struggles that were going on. and
ice could be the forshadow that the time off war will end the war because
Germany suffered from the loss of claims and took blame for WWI.

Thomas Conran from United States
Comment 103 of 261, added on March 2nd, 2006 at 2:48 AM.

Robert Frost is twisting an age old question of how the world will end,
with human relationships. “Some say the world will end in fire, / some say
in ice.” As we read through the poem, though it is short, it answers more
than just the obvious question posed; it tells us of the author’s feelings
towards relationships.
On the outside, Frost is examining what will bring the world’s demise, but
underneath he is describing a relationship. “From what I’ve tasted of
desire / I hold with those who favor fire.” Fire would certainly be able to
destroy the world in his opinion; but at the same time he is saying he has
come to know love, and it is covetable.
But he goes on to say that ice would also be able to destroy the world,
that coldness would be a sufficient end. “To say that for destruction ice /
is also great / and would suffice.” So he never really answers the question
of how the world will end, and that is appropriate when you think about it
because no one really knows for sure. But as I said this poem isn’t just
about answering some arcane uncertainty, it’s about his feelings toward
relationships.
This is a man who has seen love and knows the upside of it, the power of
it (“I hold with those who favor fire”). But he has been hurt and he has
seen both sides of passion, passionate love and passionate hate (“I think I
know enough of hate”), and if he had to go through the pain of losing
someone twice, he would choose not to love at all (“But if it had to perish
twice / To say that for destruction ice / is also great / And would
suffice”).
Summarized in one simple line: Frost would rather not love at all, than to
have loved and lost. There’s an underlying tone here, not how the world
will end – but that it will end. Relationships will end – and to a larger
extent life will end. And Frost is simply saying that we will all come to
our end eventually; whether we meet that end after a passionate marriage
that ended badly or a life of solitude devoid of much joy or sorry, we will
end – and maybe the latter of the two is good enough.


carmen from United States
Comment 102 of 261, added on February 27th, 2006 at 7:31 PM.

actually the poem is a parallel of the earth ending in fire and ice and
desire and hatred destroying humans to the same effect.

Lauren

This poem has been commented on more than 10 times. Click below to see the other comments.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 [16] 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
Share |


Information about Fire and Ice

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: 17. Fire and Ice
Volume: New Hampshire
Year: 1923
Added: Feb 1 2004
Viewed: 775 times
Poem of the Day: Feb 1 2003


Add Comment

Do you have any comments, criticism, paraphrasis or analysis of this poem that you feel would assist other visitors in understanding this poem better? If they are accepted, they will be added to this page of American Poems. Together we can build a wealth of information, but it will take some discipline and determination.

Do not post questions, pleas for homework help or anything of the sort, as these types of comments will be removed. The proper place for questions is the poetry forum.

Please note that after you post a comment, it can take up to an hour before it is visible on the website! Rest assured that your comment is not lost, so don't enter your comment again.

Comment on: 17. Fire and Ice
By: Robert Frost

Name: (required)
E-mail Address: (required)
Country:
Show E-mail Address:
Yes No
Subject:
Poem Comments:

Poem Info

Frost Info
Copyright © 2000-2012 Gunnar Bengtsson. All Rights Reserved. Links | Bookstore