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Analysis and comments on Putting in the Seed by Robert Frost

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Comment 25 of 145, added on January 12th, 2007 at 12:07 AM.

First off, who cares if Mr. Frost was gay?

That out of the way, the poem seems to me a tangle of metaphor and literal
translation. For example, "burying the white" can be read as filling the
page as well as read with the following line (i.e. showing the tending of
one's property). Of course, the obvious sexual references can still be bled
from these same lines when introducing "barren", "smooth bean" and
"wrinkled pea" in the subsequent lines.

It seems Frost challenges us next when he claims that his mate might
"become like" him, "Slave to a Springtime passion...". This might appear to
contradict the idea that he is being called from the field to tend to his
mate's needs (since he here claims to have the passion himself). Of course,
the tending of these fields requires both the passion and the literal act.

On balance, a beautiful piece that mixes sexuality with natural metaphors
of nature both rich and complex.

uncarvedblock123 from United States
Comment 24 of 145, added on January 11th, 2007 at 1:03 PM.


Yes, this is very sexy, but I feel more of the practical poet here; for
me, he seems to be talking about the poet's need for someone down to earth
to come and rouse him from his muse, as he writes and he appreciates his
wife for keeping the house together and giving his life some schedule
because otherwise he would be too absorbed in his work to notice, just as
he may very well be when gardening, too. There's not much difference in
the professions.

ea
Comment 23 of 145, added on January 10th, 2007 at 3:08 PM.

hey everyone I came on here to finalise my research on Robert Frost's
poetry just to check out if there's anything I've been missing. Turns out
there was and I have my first a-level exam tomorrow afternoon. I really do
recommend studying this site! Well worth it! I actually now do feel filled
with confidence, which I could really need right about now! Thanks to you
all!

Sarah from United Kingdom
Comment 22 of 145, added on May 21st, 2006 at 9:56 AM.

I can't see how there can be so many meanings/symbols in one small poem.
i'm studying frost for my AS-Level course and with the exam in 2 days i
thought i'd better brush up on my knowledge of him but everything is the
same
it's either, life, death, sex or love.
to be honest i think people over analyse the poems. he didnt write them
thinkin oh i'll add a metaphor in here to make it read like tht. it's
stupid.

Tina from United Kingdom
Comment 21 of 145, added on April 25th, 2006 at 10:45 AM.

Hey, ive studied Frost for two years now and after thorough research im sad
to tell you all but Mr Frost was/is Gay! But looking at your well achieved
analysis i agree that this poem is an act of making love, yet, frost being
homosexual i beleive he is talking about his intimate love for nature,
rather than a woman, he would rather enjoy planthing seeds in the soil and
being close to nature than to a womans body, he is using nature to describe
this act. Another thought to tease your minds with is if you read lines 3
and 4, the word white suggests something pure, virginity perhaps? he may be
talking that this is so precious and delecate that it is something not to
let go of lightly, hence the delecate soft petals. Could go on but il leave
these thoughts with you guys, many regards will.

Will from United Kingdom
Comment 20 of 145, added on April 25th, 2006 at 7:20 AM.

I agree with all of you that the poem is indeed relating the act of sex
with the fertilization of the earth, both resulting in new life. However, I
think on a deeper level Frost may be conveying that he holds the same love
for nature that most would associate with love making.

So I think that there is def. multiple layers in which one can read this
poem, but hopefully this helps some of you do your exams and assignments
:-D good luck

SmartDancer from United States
Comment 19 of 145, added on March 18th, 2006 at 4:37 PM.

the beauty of this poem is that it portrays the beauty of procreation. i am
studying lit. as an a-level course and this poem is one of frost's poem
that i believe will touch women especially mothers to prove to them that it
is or still what it.
i love poems like thiis because they touch the soul and i am more of a
romantic person.
kuddos to frost.

anu young from United Kingdom
Comment 18 of 145, added on February 26th, 2006 at 6:42 AM.

I never studied this poem when I was in school. There were other Frost
poems that we studied - ie 'The Road not Taken' 'Mending Wall'.

The first time I read this, even though I see the natural overtures, I
understood it to be about pregnancy. I take it that my husband did to, as
he was the one who introduced it to me, and we are expecting our first
child.

When I went back to re-read it, I realized it wasn't necessarily about
pregnancy, but about the act of sex itself.









American Lady from United States
Comment 17 of 145, added on February 2nd, 2006 at 12:07 PM.

Frost said himself that the meanings of his poems were generally the most
obvious ones.

David from United Kingdom
Comment 16 of 145, added on December 9th, 2005 at 4:19 AM.

personally i think Robert Frost is not a very good poet,because there are
to many hidden meanings in his work,its hard to work it all out!

trisha from United Kingdom

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Information about Putting in the Seed

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: 14. Putting in the Seed
Volume: Mountain Interval
Year: 1916
Added: Feb 1 2004
Viewed: 16253 times
Poem of the Day: Aug 25 2003


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