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Analysis and comments on Putting in the Seed by Robert Frost

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Comment 6 of 116, added on October 17th, 2005 at 8:18 AM.

I really feel that this poem is an extended metaphor for a block of wood.
The poem and the block of wood are very similar. Both could be made into
something rather beautiful and nice, but just like a drunk carpenter, Frost
just couldn't be bothered to add something special to this poem. Just a
bunch of lines that happen to rhyme - like a wood block just happens to be
an effective doorstop.
Oh and you could also say that it's a continuation of 'After Apple
Picking', which is a rather more special work from Frost's collections.

Matt from United Kingdom
Comment 5 of 116, added on October 3rd, 2005 at 12:06 PM.

I am also studying this for my A Levels I think this particular poem is
ambiguous with many different meanings the main the growth of a plant or a
baby!! "Seedling" confirms it has something to do with plants and "arched
body" suggests the figure is of a baby lying in a womans stomach

David Hurn from United Kingdom
Comment 4 of 116, added on September 28th, 2005 at 8:09 AM.

I have read an analysis of this which says the poem is purely about his
love of nature, but my English teacher insists that he has ulterior motives
in all of his poems. In this case I would definitely suggest that there are
sexual connotations throughout, and also ideas of reproduction,
procreation. For example 'barren' can not only mean empty, but can also
mean that a person is unable to have children. I think that the poem may be
about Frost realising that the only love he has is for nature, and he no
longer craves sex (he was writing this poem when he was slightly older, and
had conceived all the children he would ever have).

Rosy from United Kingdom
Comment 3 of 116, added on September 28th, 2005 at 5:25 AM.

i am also studying him for my a-levels and personally i hink he is a
rubbish poet. I think that its nice to have a hidden meaning in a poem and
have to think about it. But when everyone has to try just tothink of
anything ithink its pointless. it doesnt convey a message at all. thanks
exam board for giving us this.

kayleigh from United Kingdom
Comment 2 of 116, added on September 25th, 2005 at 6:42 AM.

i have to study this poem for my a levels and i feel that this poem is very
metaphorical and that the seed represents a new life (a baby). i interpret
this poem as having sexual qualitys to it

leigh from United Kingdom
Comment 1 of 116, added on September 14th, 2005 at 11:36 AM.

I think that this poem is about the beginning and end of life. The title
refers to the beginning of life, like planting a seed and line 12 refers to
the end of life.

Jayme from United Kingdom

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Information about Putting in the Seed

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: 14. Putting in the Seed
Volume: Mountain Interval
Year: 1916
Added: Feb 1 2004
Viewed: 16024 times
Poem of the Day: Aug 25 2003


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