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Analysis and comments on The Oven Bird by Robert Frost

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Comment 9 of 59, added on May 2nd, 2010 at 12:00 AM.
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Focus For,legal will league county fix importance paper low immediately
about agent begin justice community press element train holiday likely
session around football hate god consist no-one advantage thus bridge
ticket because similar in heart son secretary grow name woman on extend
grow steal somewhere flat response this initial revolution discussion
administration information century conduct used equipment violence off weak
return campaign ring active fight agency extend open inside sale support
help visit star cat visit beyond focus beautiful already brother activity
bind control follow common plastic fund transport category

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Comment 8 of 59, added on January 14th, 2009 at 7:04 PM.

Yes at first i did not understand is but then on further introspection i
began to understand that he meant for us to know that we are not here on
the heart for long.

ODEAN from Jamaica
Comment 7 of 59, added on October 12th, 2007 at 7:59 AM.

I'm writing an IB paper 3 on this poem, and I believe it to be fairly
ambiguous with its theme. The in depth values and interpretations of this
poem are the theme of death in relation to modernism. If you study the poem
carefully you notice his structured technique's are quite loosely monitored
with a rhyming scheme of A,A,B;B,B,A;A,B,A,B;B,A,B,A spelling carefully the
terms used within each stanza. This proves Millay's acceptance of the
woman's role in modernism.

George Williams from Guyana
Comment 6 of 59, added on November 23rd, 2005 at 10:53 AM.

rhyme skem:
A,A,B; C,D; E,C,E; F,F; G,H,G,H.

enjambment or run on line:
Verse1 : He says the early petal-fall is past
Verse2 : when pear and cherry bloom went down
in showers

Is costitued from 4 peon

there is allitteration: verse1: i,e
verse2: i,o
verse3: o,a
verse4: o,e
verse5: i,e
verse6: e,a
verse7: e,o
verse8: o,a
verse9: a,o
verse10: a,e
verse11: i,e
verse12: e,a
verse13: i,a

fabio detto fab from Italy
Comment 5 of 59, added on November 15th, 2005 at 3:40 PM.

ithink its about industrilasation - states "highways dust is over all" its
from the bird perspective, and the diminshed thing could be polluted
countrysdie or just general - every1 else looks 2 far into it.

emma from United Kingdom
Comment 4 of 59, added on July 1st, 2005 at 6:32 PM.

This poem, similar to "Nothing Gold Can Stay", reflects on mortality and
the fleeting quality of nature. Frost was preoccupied with the cycle of
nature and especially autumn and the ironic beauty of dying leaves,
signifying the onset of winter. He captures the impossibility of
perfection in this poem. This is reinforced by his reference to the Fall
of Adam and Eve in the last line - "a diminished thing".

Allison from United States
Comment 3 of 59, added on January 23rd, 2005 at 11:26 AM.

this poem is about the creation of poetry. the oven bird symbolises robert
frost as a poet and the song of the bird is his poetry. throughout frost's
life he suffered depression and lack of self confidence and belief and it
is often thought that this poem connotes how frost feels his poetry is
commonplace just like the oven bird is by nature. nevertheless, frost is
also saying that he is a poet that works with the diminshed thing. he,
unlike other poets of his time, rejects the romanticism idea and works with
things that arent so attractive. he works at a time when all other poets
have their poetry complete. the fall he refers to is also thought to
portray the fall of man and the darkness of mans heart.

carrie-anne from United Kingdom
Comment 2 of 59, added on November 24th, 2004 at 5:07 PM.

I believe that this poem speaks of a person, who knows change has come.
This person wonders what will happen to him, and what he will do, because
of this change. But I think in the end the poem is trying to convey that
the person has hope for the future, and that is all we can do in times of
great change.

laura from Canada
Comment 1 of 59, added on November 10th, 2004 at 3:06 PM.

i think this poem is about the middle of life, when your powers just begin
to fail you. also your looks, with the early petal-fall. but you still have
a voice, a voice loud enough for everyone to hear, not a pretty but a
persuasive one

amy from United States

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Information about The Oven Bird

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: 10. The Oven Bird
Volume: Mountain Interval
Year: 1916
Added: Feb 1 2004
Viewed: 20848 times


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