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Analysis and comments on Love and a Question by Robert Frost

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Comment 24 of 144, added on March 8th, 2009 at 2:09 PM.

that really gets me flowing!

Christelle from United States
Comment 23 of 144, added on March 8th, 2009 at 2:05 PM.

That poem is really sweet!

Christelle from United States
Comment 22 of 144, added on February 19th, 2009 at 1:23 AM.

the poem is the representation of the eternal conflict of Frost. Be it the
conflict betwen feelings of a mother and a father of 'the home burial' or
the conflict of a man to choose between two of his emotions: emotion
towards his wife and emotion towards a stranger caught in thick of night
with all windows closed on him.

sonia from India
Comment 21 of 144, added on January 13th, 2009 at 9:07 AM.

this is a great poem,
has to be my all time favorite. ;D
i love it.


polly from United States
Comment 20 of 144, added on January 13th, 2009 at 9:07 AM.

this is a great poem,
has to be my all time favorite. ;D
i love it.


polly from United States
Comment 19 of 144, added on January 23rd, 2008 at 8:51 PM.

this poem is a perfect form of pure art.

leeloo johnston from United States
Comment 18 of 144, added on December 30th, 2007 at 6:35 PM.

So does the man allow the stranger to stay the night or not?

Jessica from United States
Comment 17 of 144, added on November 28th, 2007 at 5:00 AM.

This is a metaphorical poem about the bridegroom's own anxiety about his
bride's expectations of their first night together. He wants nothing to
mar their love - yet he himself is the stranger with the green stick. Get
it? He is inexperienced and she is a young rose, not some fixture of
jewelry that will remain unchanged by the event that lays before them on
that dark, windowless road of life.

ea
Comment 16 of 144, added on November 28th, 2007 at 2:50 AM.

The fact that the poem ends on a questionable note, meaning that the reader
still has to answer the question for themselves, reflects to how people
have many problems in their lives and how it is up to them to figure out
the best answers.

Liz from United States
Comment 15 of 144, added on September 6th, 2007 at 10:03 AM.

Among many others things depicted in "Love and a Question", the poem
illustrates someone who is torn between his love for his wife and his love
for poetry- Seeing the world through the poet's eyes so to speak. Can one
who is so passionate about the poetic exploration of truth "harbor" that
love (or care) in the bridle house without marring both loves? Will both
loves suffer for his "inability to choose"? You'll find the same concept
in Keat's poem "Bright Star"- Robert Frost was an avid disciple of Keats
and found much inspiration and solice in his poetry.

wildechild76 from United States

This poem has been commented on more than 10 times. Click below to see the other comments.
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Information about Love and a Question

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: 4. Love and a Question
Volume: A Boy's Will
Year: 1913
Added: Feb 1 2004
Viewed: 1187 times


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