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Analysis and comments on Ghost House by Robert Frost

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Comment 46 of 146, added on January 31st, 2007 at 3:25 PM.

This poem is stupid. It makes me feel gay. I don't like it at all.

Dr. Susay
Comment 45 of 146, added on May 18th, 2006 at 3:08 PM.

I didn't like the poem it was really long and the ryhming was off

Eric chestnut from United States
Comment 44 of 146, added on April 15th, 2006 at 1:54 PM.

"I know not who these mute folks are who share this unlit place with me" I
believe that frost is speaking from the point of view of a man already
dead. Possably even foreseeing his own death.Frost is Known for his ability
to mix the cycle of mans life with that of natures, here again he has
splendly meshed the natural rythm of both.

g. Kats from United States
Comment 43 of 146, added on April 1st, 2006 at 9:29 AM.

This poem is something worth reading over and over again... i enjoyed the
use of words he chose along with how he made the rhythm run so smoothly.
One of my favorite from him so far.

mike from United States
Comment 42 of 146, added on March 23rd, 2006 at 10:38 AM.

I interpreted this poem to be about Frost revisiting his old house that he
had once had many memories, loved ones, and a lot of his life. He is seeing
it again and expressing his lonlyness. He is a lonly man and says he will
forever be there with them and never forget. The imagery he uses shows how
important this place was to him and the ppl in it. He had good memories but
then again they are only memories and cannot be relived. Hope that helps
some ppl.

Jenna from United Kingdom
Comment 41 of 146, added on March 10th, 2006 at 12:03 PM.

I love dis one holla back

Keekee from United States
Comment 40 of 146, added on March 7th, 2006 at 8:12 PM.

its my fav...so good.... i love the 3rd word very muihc\

Curis from Australia
Comment 39 of 146, added on February 22nd, 2006 at 8:42 AM.

i think i found out what the poem is actually talking about, in the first
part he's just talking about the old house thats has been forgotten, and
then it goes on to the the grave yard, that has also been forgotten, and
then he talks about the forgotten people lying inside the grave yard

erik umland from United States
Comment 38 of 146, added on February 18th, 2006 at 12:01 PM.

I want to know what the poem means and find a site that has any information
about the poem and thanks if you show me one because i really need one for
my research paper, because i got a 50 on the rough draft and i need to get
an A on the final to keep from failing the class, Honors English II

Ry from United States
Comment 37 of 146, added on January 23rd, 2006 at 12:55 AM.

what significants does this poem have on robert frosts life???

john doe from Canada

This poem has been commented on more than 10 times. Click below to see the other comments.
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Information about Ghost House

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: 2. Ghost House
Volume: A Boy's Will
Year: 1913
Added: Feb 1 2004
Viewed: 86539 times
Poem of the Day: Dec 13 2006


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