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April 21st, 2014 - we have 234 poets, 8,025 poems and 103,948 comments.
Analysis and comments on A Dream Within A Dream by Edgar Allan Poe

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Comment 45 of 305, added on May 16th, 2005 at 7:24 PM.

i think he expresses himself with the use of cannibas not alchol. marijuana
just isnt socially accepted its a shame. (don't blame me if i missspelled
somethingd im stonedt)

xavier from United States
Comment 44 of 305, added on May 15th, 2005 at 2:55 PM.

This poem is about life and how quick death creeps upon us. Poe uses the
sand to act as life when he states about how quick it creeps through his
hand.

John from Grenada
Comment 43 of 305, added on May 13th, 2005 at 10:38 AM.

I think this poem is very sad about isn't every thing we see nothing but a
dream? It's coo

Mia from United States
Comment 42 of 305, added on May 11th, 2005 at 10:28 AM.

What would you say Poe's poetic style was? Meaning did he use rhythm,
rhyme, rhyme scheme, figurative language, etc.

Jordan from United States
Comment 41 of 305, added on May 9th, 2005 at 5:42 PM.

A very expressive and sad poem...I believe Poe was a very sad man who
wanted the world to understand his inner-emotions. He probably became an
alcoholic because he felt he can express himself better without having to
deal with reality. I believe the effects of the alcohol was speaking to
him that brought out his ways of thinking and feelings.

Marychelo from United States
Comment 40 of 305, added on May 7th, 2005 at 5:50 PM.

In the first stansa of this poem, Edger is expresing his sadness for a
loved one who has gone away. The second stansa could be interpreted in many
difrent ways. obviusly the waves and sand represent something, some people
think the sand is his life, or his dreams, or maby his memories, but I
think they are all of the people that were close to him. In Poe's life he
lost many members of his famly and his wife to an illness. He was also a
drunk and was always looking for someone to love after his wife died. This
would suport my conclusion about this poem.

Hannah from United States
Comment 39 of 305, added on May 3rd, 2005 at 7:26 PM.

I think that this is one of Poe's best poems.

Nikki from United States
Comment 38 of 305, added on May 3rd, 2005 at 7:55 AM.

The poem i just read was a great poem i have read alot of poems from
different poets but this one i really enjoyed it has alot of potential and
its not like the others i have read.

cara mobley from United States
Comment 37 of 305, added on April 30th, 2005 at 7:24 AM.

I believe this poem is Poe coming to terms with his mortality. In the
first two lines, Poe is saying farewell to life, his immortality. I
disagree with the interpretation that Poe is saying goodbye to a lover. He
is giving a kiss on the brow, not the lips or the cheek. It seems a more
"general" farwell. Now, you could say this is for rhyming purposes (brow
and now), but I like to think this was more purposeful. He goes on to say,
"you are not wrong, who deem, that my days have been a dream." It seems to
me that he is talking not to just one person, but to everyone.

His days are dreams, because they do not exist anymore. The days past are
gone and now only memories, or dreams. All his days pass into
nonexistance, just like the larger "dream" of his life eventually will.
Dreams within a dream. His previous hopes that this isn't so, that he will
always exist, that there is something more, is gone.

In the second stanza, nonexistance is given the form of the ocean, and his
days are grains of sand, that he is powerless to stop from slipping away. I
think here he wanted to give the impression and image of an hourglass. The
waves of nonexistance are stealing his days, and will eventually take all
of them.

Even though he has accepted the fact of his mortality in the first stanza,
he still fights it in the second, pleading with God (if he exists) to save
him, to let him know that his life will not pass into the "deep" of
nothingness. He wants to believe and have hope again that his existance is
not just a dream and has purpose, so instead of stating it like at the end
of the first stanza, in desperation he asks it as a question in the
second.

"Is all that we see or seem, but a dream within a dream?"




Sam from United States
Comment 36 of 305, added on April 24th, 2005 at 2:07 PM.

I'm from Chile and I'm studing for being an english teacher. I had to chose
one of Poe's poems for an activity and I think this one is really deep. may
be you can imagine that Poe is talking about his wife or love (r), but the
thing is Poe wants to make people think about what they have in order to
enjoy it and make them realize about the importance of living every moment
as the last one.

Sergio Cerda Lira from Chile

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Information about A Dream Within A Dream

Poet: Edgar Allan Poe
Poem: A Dream Within A Dream
Added: Feb 20 2003
Viewed: 1076 times


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