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Analysis and comments on To the Memory of the Brave Americans by Philip Freneau

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Comment 11 of 91, added on July 6th, 2008 at 8:55 AM.

With high regard for the American soldiers who fought for freedom, Freneau
expressed such feeling through a powerful idyll. As I was reading through
the poem, i sensed a feeling of triumph amidst the "death" of the soldiers.
Despite their downfall, America was liberated. And it was through their
bravery and sense of patriotism that this happened.


I especially liked the lines--
"None distant viewed the fatal plain,
None grieved, in such a cause to die--".
It depicted valor with strong will that even pursued death. I can just
imagine the soldiers running towards the battle field with gnashing teeth
and weapon-clenched fists, ready to fight... ready to die... ready for
freedom.

I would like to honor the Americans for such bravery and will. But I must
not neglect my countrymen who fought for the same cause, perhaps with the
same will.
Mabuhay!

Val Chuaquico from Philippines
Comment 10 of 91, added on June 22nd, 2008 at 7:24 AM.

Philip Morin Freneau lived as a nature lover and a very patriotic man. His

intense love for his country is very vivid in his innumerable writings. He

basically wrote a number of anti-British pieces.
Moreover, in his writings he was able to combine his appreciation of
nature to the political situation being faced by America during his era.
This later on is said to have paved the way of Transcendentalism in
literature.

Reading his biography, I found out that he was supposed to study ministry
but then in sudden turn of events he found himself writing poems expressing

his great devotion to his country and his indignation against Britain.
Even these days he is regarded as the Poet of the Revolution and the Father

of the American Literature.

Based on my readings, I could say that he made use of Godís gift of writing

in service to his country. He served as a guardian in protecting the
Americansí moral and uplifting their self-image in spite of the turmoil and

travail they were experiencing because of the war.

I am very much impressed to realize how he skillfully used his pen to
express his disgust to the English country yet be able to produce
masterpieces of writings which up to know are regarded as important
contributions from his time.



Roh Suhyeun from Philippines
Comment 9 of 91, added on June 19th, 2008 at 4:52 AM.

"Then rushed to meet the insulting foe;
They took the spear--BUT LEFT THE SHIELD."

Judith Ochengco from Philippines
Comment 8 of 91, added on June 19th, 2008 at 1:18 AM.

I was told when I was very young that if there were no nation, there will
be no home.What we are enjoying now came from those whom foght with lives.
War is the most horrible and cruel reality. Soldiers should be the most
respectful people. They use their precious life to fight for a better
nation for their fellowmen.Be thankful, cherish the life we have.

Xiayi Zhang from Philippines
Comment 7 of 91, added on June 13th, 2008 at 4:56 AM.

Philip Morin Freneau lived as a nature lover and a very patriotic man. His
intense love for his country is very vivid in his innumerable writings. He
basically wrote a number of anti-British pieces.
Moreover, in his writings he was able to combine his appreciation of
nature to the political situation being faced by America during his era.
This later on is said to have paved the way of Transcendentalism in
literature.

Reading his biography, I found out that he was supposed to study ministry
but then in sudden turn of events he found himself writing poems expressing
his great devotion to his country and his indignation against Britain.
Even these days he is regarded as the Poet of the Revolution and the Father
of the American Literature.

Based on my readings, I could say that he made use of Godís gift of writing
in service to his country. He served as a guardian in protecting the
Americansí moral and uplifting their self-image in spite of the turmoil and
travail they were experiencing because of the war.

I am very much impressed to realize how he skillfully used his pen to
express his disgust to the English country yet be able to produce
masterpieces of writings which up to know are regarded as important
contributions from his time.





Roh Suhyeun from Russia
Comment 6 of 91, added on June 12th, 2008 at 2:17 AM.

i love the poem of Philip Frenuau because it shows that the american
soldiers are doing their best in everything just to protect the people and
save their country from terrorism.. i admire the poet because he was able
to give American soldiers recognition for what they have done for their
country.. It shows that the soldiers didnt care for their lives.. what is
important is to do their job..

Nicole Caranto from Philippines
Comment 5 of 91, added on June 10th, 2008 at 7:21 AM.

In addition to what I have already said, the lives of the American soldiers
and heroes were not wasted. Their independence did them good, their
independence was well used by the government and the people, and now they
have achieved, they have become a world power. If before, other countries
are conquering their territory, now it is them who is putting great
influence to the countries all over the world. This poem is also very
appropriate to us Filipinos today since the Philippines' Independence Day
is on June 12. It reminds us of how our heroes fought for our freedom and
gave up their lives for the country. But unlike the Americans, sometimes I
wish that the Philippines had not been independent. With all the problems
our country is facing, sometimes I think if the country would have been
better off if we were still under the American colony in particular because
of the prosperity their country has at the present. Maybe our country would
be richer, maybe we would be having better lives, maybe we would have no
OFWs, maybe other nationalities would respect Filipinos more, or maybe they
would even look up to us.

Dannah Chua from Philippines
Comment 4 of 91, added on June 9th, 2008 at 1:17 AM.

it's a sad, lovely poem and through the words of Freneau, i could imagine
what was happening. Soldiers and civilians dying, many are wounded and
running for their lives. Americans are truly brave and should be idolized
for it. The blood and sweat they have wasted in exchange for their
country's independence is something to be proud of.

Dannah Chua from Philippines
Comment 3 of 91, added on June 6th, 2008 at 10:07 PM.

It was like picturing Freneau apprehensively writing in details and
observing the Americans and Britons in action. I was overwhelmed that I
canít put my comments into paragraphs, will a poem be enough?

A heroís grave we might say,
the Eutaw Springs had become--
where patriots of contending parties,
each fought as one.

Claiming Carolinas was not in vain,
the proud soldiers took no shame.
The land became a test of will,
For freedom and Independence! It was a duty to kill.

The Americans once oppressed,
in here they found no rest!
Avowed was the first strike,
with Green first in line,
the climax was near, awaiting.

General Greene earned himself,
the good beasts of the best,
from Virginia, Maryland, Washington, Delaware,
the British struggled and fled. (to Charleston)

The Continentals won
and ransacked the Britishís left over feast
without them fathoming,
the reinforced British fleet.
Astounded the Americans,
they canít be taken back.
The last cry they gave,
completing boldly the last wave.


Both belligerents succumbed,
blood littered too much.


The last claim for South Carolina showed the competence of both parties
pushed to the farthest of their limits. Who won might still be a
peripatetic question, but the thing to be joyous about is the Americansí
determination for sovereignty or identity perhaps. From Freneauís last two
lines (of this poem), it is interpreted that Americans who were once
oppressed by the British rule sought happiness in the New World. Yes, lives
were spent enoughóbut the Americans were more pleased that they can make
their own destiny without being impeded by any forms of convention.
Americans were once dreamers, but winning the Battle for Independence
transcended the existence of a dreamóit transformed to a reality. Americans
(as of the moment) are neither broken souls nor travelers of broken dreams
anymore.

Angeli Rivera from Philippines
Comment 2 of 91, added on June 5th, 2008 at 6:56 AM.

For me this poem shows the bravery of most Americans, especially the
soldiers who fought in the war just to protect their country. Even though
they are already experiencing so much pain in their body they are not
giving up, they are still fighting for the sake of their country. Those
Americans almost give up their lives just to save and protect their own
country.

aiza sarmiento from Philippines

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Information about To the Memory of the Brave Americans

Poet: Philip Freneau
Poem: To the Memory of the Brave Americans
Added: Jan 31 2004
Viewed: 591 times


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