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Biography of Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker (1893 - 1967)

Dorothy Parker was one of the most successful and influential women writers of her era. Dorothy Rothschild was born on August 22, 1893 in West End, N.J. Her mother was Scottish and her father Jewish. She was "a late unexpected arrival in a loveless family". At the age of four her mother died. Her father remarried and Dorothy's home life was strained and distant at best. She was educated in private schools in N.J. and N.Y.C. Dorothy suffered two tragedies as a young woman. Her brother Henry died aboard the Titanic and a yearlater her father passed away. Dorothy moved to New York City in 1911 where she lived in a boarding house and worked as a piano player at a dance school. At the age of 21 she began submitting her writing to various magazines and papers. Her poem "Any Porch" was accepted and published by Vanity Fair. A few months later she was hired by Vogue, a sister publication of Vanity Fair. While working at Vogue her submissions to Vanity Fair continued to be published. After two years of working at Vogue she was transferred to Vanity Fair. In 1917 she married Edwin Parker, a stock broker. The marriage only lasted a brief time, but now she was Mrs. Dorothy Parker. At Vanity Fair she became New York's only female drama critic at the time. In the spring of 1919 she was invited to the Algonquin Hotel because of her connections at Vanity Fair and her reputation as a drama critic. This was the beginning of the famous Algonquin Round Table, an renowned intellectual literary circle.Dorothy was the only female founding member. It brought together such writers as Robert Benchley, Robert Sherwood, James Thurber, George Kaufman and many others. Dorothy was still writing for Vanity Fair but her reviews were becoming increasingly sarcastic and unfavorable. She was fired from the magazine in 1921. To earn money she began writing subtitles for a movie by D.W. Griffith.

Dorothy soon found another job at the magazine Ainslee's where she could be as sarcastic, bitchy, and witty as she pleased. In 1922 she wrote her first short story - "Such a PrettyLittle Picture" - this was the beginning of her literary career. In January of 1924 Dorothy divorced and moved into the Algonquin Hotel. She began writing plays; "Close Harmony" was her first. The first issue of The New Yorker was published in early 1925 and Dorothy contributed drama reviews and poetry for the first few issues. In February of 1926 she set off for Paris, but continued contributing articles to the New Yorker and Life. While in France she befriended Earnest Hemingway; surprisingly, considering his male chauvinist attitudes. Dorothy returned to New York in November. Her first book of poetry, "Enough Rope", was published and received favorable reviews as well ad being a commercial success. In 1927 she became very involved in the Sacco and Vanzetti trial. She traveled to Boston to join the protests against the execution of two innocent men. During the protest she was arrested but refused to travel in the paddy wagon, insisting on walking to jail. She was a committed socialist from this day until her death.

In October Dorothy became the book reviewer for the The New Yorker Magazine, under the title "The Constant Reader". In February of 1929 Dorothy's short story "The Big Blonde" was published and she won the prestigious O. Henry award for the best short story of the year. That same year Dorothy began doing screen writing in Hollywood. She moved to Hollywoodbecause she needed the money and was offered a contract by MGM. Dorothy wrote many screenplays over the next decade. In 1933 she once again traveled to Europe where she met her second husband Alan Campbell. He was also of Scottish-Jewish descent, and a rumored bisexual. They became screen writing partners and signed a contract with Paramount Pictures in 1935. In 1936 she helped found the Anti Nazi League. In 1937 Dorothy won an academy award for her joint screenplay of "A Star is Born".

Throughout the 1940's Dorothy continued writing prose and short stories along with screenplays. She was widely published in many magazines and Viking released an anthology of her short stories and prose. In 1949 she divorced Alan Campbell, but later they remarried.

In the 1950's she was called before the House on un-American Activities and pleaded the first instead of the fifth, still refusing to name any names. In 1952-1953 testimonywas given against her before the HUAC. From 1957-1963 she worked as a book reviewer for Esquire magazine. In 1959 she was inducted into American Academy of Arts and Letters. She was a distinguished Visiting Professor of English at California State College in L.A. In 1964 she published her final magazine piece in November's issue of Esquire.

On June 7, 1967, she was found dead of a heart attack in her room at Hotel Volney in New York City. She bequeathed her entire literary estate to the NAACP.



189 Poems written by Dorothy Parker

The poems are by default sorted according to volume, but you can also choose to sort them alphabetically or by page views.

Volume | Alphabetically | Page Views | Comments | [First Lines]


First LineComments
"And if he's gone away," said she,
"It's queer," she said; "I see the light Comments and analysis of The Maid-Servant at the Inn by Dorothy Parker 9 Comments
"So surely is she mine," you say, and turn
"Then we will have tonight!" we said. Comments and analysis of On Cheating the Fiddler by Dorothy Parker 8 Comments
... So, praise the gods, Catullus is away!
(J. H., 1905-1930)
The Lives and Times of John Keats,
A dream lies dead here. May you softly go
A nobler king had never breath- Comments and analysis of Guinevere at Her Fireside by Dorothy Parker 204 Comments
A single flow'r he sent me, since we met. Comments and analysis of One Perfect Rose by Dorothy Parker 302 Comments
A string of shiny days we had,
Accursed from their birth they be Comments and analysis of Reuben's Children by Dorothy Parker 6 Comments
All her hours were yellow sands,
Although I work, and seldom cease, Comments and analysis of Alexandre Dumas and His Son by Dorothy Parker 6 Comments
Always I knew that it could not last
And if my heart be scarred and burned, Comments and analysis of Incurable by Dorothy Parker 6 Comments
And if, my friend, you'd have it end, Comments and analysis of They Part by Dorothy Parker 6 Comments
And let her loves, when she is dead,
And now I have another lad! Comments and analysis of The Danger of Writing Defiant Verse by Dorothy Parker 25 Comments
Authors and actors and artists and such
Back of my back, they talk of me, Comments and analysis of The Whistling Girl by Dorothy Parker 1 Comment
Because my love is quick to come and go-
Because your eyes are slant and slow,
By the time you swear you're his, Comments and analysis of Unfortunate Coincidence by Dorothy Parker 50 Comments
Carlyle combined the lit'ry life
Chloe's hair, no doubt, was brighter;
Daily dawns another day; Comments and analysis of Inscription for the Ceiling of a Bedroom by Dorothy Parker 35 Comments
Daily I listen to wonder and woe,
Dante Gabriel Rossetti
Dear dead Victoria
Dearest one, when I am dead Comments and analysis of Prayer for a Prayer by Dorothy Parker 30 Comments
Death's the lover that I'd be taking; Comments and analysis of The Trifler by Dorothy Parker 1 Comment
Drink and dance and laugh and lie, Comments and analysis of The Flaw in Paganism by Dorothy Parker 4 Comments
Every love's the love before Comments and analysis of Summary by Dorothy Parker 12 Comments
For one, the amaryllis and the rose;
For this my mother wrapped me warm,
Four be the things I am wiser to know: Comments and analysis of Inventory by Dorothy Parker 12 Comments
Ghosts of all my lovely sins, Comments and analysis of Rainy Night by Dorothy Parker 3 Comments
Go I must along my ways
God's acre was her garden-spot, she said;
Half across the world from me
He will love you presently Comments and analysis of To a Much Too Unfortunate Lady by Dorothy Parker 8 Comments
He'd have given me rolling lands, Comments and analysis of The Choice by Dorothy Parker 43 Comments
Helen of Troy had a wandering glance;
Her mind lives in a quiet room, Comments and analysis of Interior by Dorothy Parker 7 Comments
Here in my heart I am Helen;
Hope it was that tutored me, Comments and analysis of Post-Graduate by Dorothy Parker 4 Comments
How shall I wail, that wasn't meant for weeping? Comments and analysis of Convalescent by Dorothy Parker 8 Comments
I always saw, I always said Comments and analysis of The Red Dress by Dorothy Parker 4 Comments
I cannot rest, I cannot rest
I do not like my state of mind; Comments and analysis of Symptom Recital by Dorothy Parker 1 Comment
I know I have been happiest at your side; Comments and analysis of I Know I Have Been Happiest by Dorothy Parker 14 Comments
I met a man the other day-
I never may turn the loop of a road Comments and analysis of Temps Perdu by Dorothy Parker 1 Comment
I never see that prettiest thing- Comments and analysis of Cherry White by Dorothy Parker 4 Comments
I shall come back without fanfaronade Comments and analysis of I Shall Come Back by Dorothy Parker 202 Comments
I shall tread, another year, Comments and analysis of Paths by Dorothy Parker 196 Comments
I think that I shall never know
I think, no matter where you stray, Comments and analysis of But Not Forgotten by Dorothy Parker 5 Comments
I was seventy-seven, come August,
I'm sick of embarking in dories
I'm wearied of wearying love, my friend, Comments and analysis of Ultimatum by Dorothy Parker 11 Comments
I. The Minor Poet Comments and analysis of Tombstones in the Starlight by Dorothy Parker 1 Comment
If I don't drive around the park, Comments and analysis of Observation by Dorothy Parker 417 Comments
If I had a shiny gun, Comments and analysis of Frustration by Dorothy Parker 231 Comments
If I should labor through daylight and dark, Comments and analysis of Philosophy by Dorothy Parker 2 Comments
If I were mild, and I were sweet, Comments and analysis of Dilemma by Dorothy Parker 239 Comments
If it shine or if it rain, Comments and analysis of The New Love by Dorothy Parker 1 Comment
If wild my breast and sore my pride, Comments and analysis of Rhyme Against Living by Dorothy Parker 4 Comments
If you should sail for Trebizond, or die,
If, with the literate, I am
In April, in April,
In May my heart was breaking- Comments and analysis of Autumn Valentine by Dorothy Parker 30 Comments
In the pathway of the sun, Comments and analysis of Penelope by Dorothy Parker 246 Comments
In youth, it was a way I had Comments and analysis of Indian Summer by Dorothy Parker 36 Comments
Into love and out again,
It costs me never a stab nor squirm
Joy stayed with me a night -- Comments and analysis of Light of Love by Dorothy Parker 17 Comments
Lady, if you'd slumber sound,
Lady, lady, never start Comments and analysis of The Lady's Reward by Dorothy Parker 34 Comments
Lady, lady, should you meet
Leave me to my lonely pillow.
Let another cross his way- Comments and analysis of Mortal Enemy by Dorothy Parker 10 Comments
Lilacs blossom just as sweet Comments and analysis of Threnody by Dorothy Parker 241 Comments
Little things that no one needs- Comments and analysis of Bric-a-Brac by Dorothy Parker 8 Comments
Little white love, your way you've taken; Comments and analysis of Now at Liberty by Dorothy Parker 11 Comments
Long I fought the driving lists,
Love has gone a-rocketing.
Love has had his way with me.
Love is sharper than stones or sticks; Comments and analysis of Ballade of Unfortunate Mammals by Dorothy Parker 1 Comment
Maidens, gather not the yew,
Men seldom make passes Comments and analysis of News Item by Dorothy Parker 10 Comments
My answers are inadequate Comments and analysis of Daylight Saving by Dorothy Parker 1 Comment
My garden blossoms pink and white,
My hand, a little raised, might press a star- Comments and analysis of Sonnet on an Alpine Night by Dorothy Parker 2 Comments
My heart went fluttering with fear Comments and analysis of Surprise by Dorothy Parker 10 Comments
My land is bare of chattering folk; Comments and analysis of Sanctuary by Dorothy Parker 17 Comments
My own dear love, he is strong and bold Comments and analysis of Love Song by Dorothy Parker 38 Comments
Needle, needle, dip and dart, Comments and analysis of The Satin Dress by Dorothy Parker 39 Comments
Never love a simple lad,
New love, new love, where are you to lead me? Comments and analysis of The Last Question by Dorothy Parker 224 Comments
No more my little song comes back; Comments and analysis of The Small Hours by Dorothy Parker 8 Comments
Now this must be the sweetest place Comments and analysis of Landscape by Dorothy Parker 1 Comment
Oh, both my shoes are shiny new,
Oh, gallant was the first love, and glittering and fine;
Oh, I can smile for you, and tilt my head,
Oh, I should like to ride the seas,
Oh, I'd been better dying, Comments and analysis of The Trusting Heart by Dorothy Parker 3 Comments
Oh, is it, then, Utopian Comments and analysis of De Profundis by Dorothy Parker 9 Comments
Oh, lead me to a quiet cell Comments and analysis of Portrait of the Artist by Dorothy Parker 2 Comments
Oh, let it be a night of lyric rain
Oh, life is a glorious cycle of song, Comments and analysis of Comment by Dorothy Parker 13 Comments
Oh, mercifullest one of all, Comments and analysis of After Spanish Proverb by Dorothy Parker 10 Comments
Oh, ponder, friend, the porcupine; Comments and analysis of Parable for a Certain Virgin by Dorothy Parker 22 Comments
Oh, seek, my love, your newer way; Comments and analysis of Godspeed by Dorothy Parker 1 Comment
Oh, there once was a lady, and so I've been told,
Oh, when I flung my heart away, Comments and analysis of Healed by Dorothy Parker 10 Comments
On sweet young earth where the myrtle presses,
Once, when I was young and true, Comments and analysis of A Very Short Song by Dorothy Parker 260 Comments
Razors pain you; Comments and analysis of Resume by Dorothy Parker 276 Comments
Roses, rooted warm in earth, Comments and analysis of Lines on Reading Too Many Poets by Dorothy Parker 11 Comments
Say my love is easy had,
Secrets, you said, would hold us two apart;
She that begs a little boon
She's passing fair; but so demure is she,
Should Heaven send me any son, Comments and analysis of Alfred, Lord Tennyson by Dorothy Parker 4 Comments
Should they whisper false of you. Comments and analysis of Superfluous Advice by Dorothy Parker 7 Comments
Sleep, pretty lady, the night is enfolding you; Comments and analysis of Lullaby by Dorothy Parker 38 Comments
So delicate my hands, and long,
So let me have the rouge again, Comments and analysis of Ninon de Lenclos, on Her Last Birthday by Dorothy Parker 2 Comments
So silent I when Love was by Comments and analysis of Anecdote by Dorothy Parker 7 Comments
So take my vows and scatter them to sea; Comments and analysis of Sonnet for the End of a Sequence by Dorothy Parker 4 Comments
Some men break your heart in two, Comments and analysis of Experience by Dorothy Parker 7 Comments
Some men, some men Comments and analysis of Chant for Dark Hours by Dorothy Parker 1 Comment
Star, that gives a gracious dole, Comments and analysis of 49 Comments
Such glorious faith as fills your limpid eyes, Comments and analysis of Verse for a Certain Dog by Dorothy Parker 36 Comments
The bird that feeds from off my palm Comments and analysis of Ornithology for Beginners by Dorothy Parker 2 Comments
The day that I was christened- Comments and analysis of Godmother by Dorothy Parker 1 Comment
The days will rally, wreathing
The first time I died, I walked my ways; Comments and analysis of Epitaph by Dorothy Parker 211 Comments
The friends I made have slipped and strayed, Comments and analysis of The Leal by Dorothy Parker 9 Comments
The ladies men admire, I've heard, Comments and analysis of Interview by Dorothy Parker 8 Comments
The pure and worthy Mrs. Stowe
The stars are soft as flowers, and as near; Comments and analysis of Midnight by Dorothy Parker 16 Comments
The sun's gone dim, and Comments and analysis of Two-Volume Novel by Dorothy Parker 7 Comments
The things she knew, let her forget again- Comments and analysis of Prayer for a New Mother by Dorothy Parker 1 Comment
Then let them point my every tear, Comments and analysis of My Own by Dorothy Parker 12 Comments
There still are kindly things for me to know, Comments and analysis of The Homebody by Dorothy Parker 1 Comment
There was a rose that faded young; Comments and analysis of Solace by Dorothy Parker 29 Comments
There was one a-riding grand Comments and analysis of There Was One by Dorothy Parker 7 Comments
There's little in taking or giving, Comments and analysis of Coda by Dorothy Parker 221 Comments
There's little to have but the things I had,
There's many and many, and not so far, Comments and analysis of Purposely Ungrammatical Love Song by Dorothy Parker 211 Comments
They hail you as their morning star Comments and analysis of Men by Dorothy Parker 233 Comments
They hurried here, as soon as you had died, Comments and analysis of Condolence by Dorothy Parker 8 Comments
They laid their hands upon my head, Comments and analysis of The False Friends by Dorothy Parker 71 Comments
They say He was a serious child, Comments and analysis of The Gentlest Lady by Dorothy Parker 4 Comments
They say of me, and so they should, Comments and analysis of Neither Bloody nor Bowed by Dorothy Parker 8 Comments
This I say, and this I know: Comments and analysis of Wisdom by Dorothy Parker 4 Comments
This is what I vow; Comments and analysis of Somebody's Song by Dorothy Parker 11 Comments
This level reach of blue is not my sea;
This, no song of an ingenue, Comments and analysis of Ballade at Thirty-Five by Dorothy Parker 26 Comments
Tonight my love is sleeping cold Comments and analysis of Requiescat by Dorothy Parker 6 Comments
Too long and quickly have I lived to vow
Travel, trouble, music, art, Comments and analysis of Faute de Mieux by Dorothy Parker 25 Comments
Unseemly are the open eyes
Unto seventy years and seven,
Upon the work of Walter Landor Comments and analysis of Walter Savage Landor by Dorothy Parker 2 Comments
We shall have our little day.
Were you to cross the world, my dear, Comments and analysis of Distance by Dorothy Parker 3 Comments
What time the gifted lady took
When first we saw the apple tree
When I admit neglect of Gissing, Comments and analysis of George Gissing by Dorothy Parker 7 Comments
When I am old, and comforted, Comments and analysis of Afternoon by Dorothy Parker 14 Comments
When I consider, pro and con, Comments and analysis of The Searched Soul by Dorothy Parker 1 Comment
When I was bold, when I was bold-
When I was young and bold and strong, Comments and analysis of The Veteran by Dorothy Parker 5 Comments
When my eyes are weeds, Comments and analysis of August by Dorothy Parker 2 Comments
When you are gone, there is nor bloom nor leaf, Comments and analysis of Little Words by Dorothy Parker 8 Comments
Who call him spurious and shoddy Comments and analysis of Charles Dickens by Dorothy Parker 8 Comments
Who lay against the sea, and fled, Comments and analysis of The Sea by Dorothy Parker 21 Comments
Who was there had seen us Comments and analysis of The Dark Girl's Rhyme by Dorothy Parker 41 Comments
Whose love is given over-well Comments and analysis of Partial Comfort by Dorothy Parker 10 Comments
Why is it, when I am in Rome, Comments and analysis of On Being a Woman by Dorothy Parker 26 Comments
With you, my heart is quiet here,
Woman wants monogamy; Comments and analysis of General Review of the Sex Situation by Dorothy Parker 646 Comments
You are brief and frail and blue- Comments and analysis of Sweet Violets by Dorothy Parker 8 Comments
You know the bloom, unearthly white, Comments and analysis of The Evening Primrose by Dorothy Parker 2 Comments
[and scarcely worth the trouble, at that] Comments and analysis of Rondeau Redouble by Dorothy Parker 2 Comments


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