Isabel met an enormous bear,
Isabel, Isabel, didn’t care;
The bear was hungry, the bear was ravenous,
The bear’s big mouth was cruel and cavernous.
The bear said, Isabel, glad to meet you,
How do, Isabel, now I’ll eat you!
Isabel, Isabel, didn’t worry.
Isabel didn’t scream or scurry.
She washed her hands and she straightened her hair up,
Then Isabel quietly ate the bear up.
Once in a night as black as pitch
Isabel met a wicked old witch.
the witch’s face was cross and wrinkled,
The witch’s gums with teeth were sprinkled.
Ho, ho, Isabel! the old witch crowed,
I’ll turn you into an ugly toad!
Isabel, Isabel, didn’t worry,
Isabel didn’t scream or scurry,
She showed no rage and she showed no rancor,
But she turned the witch into milk and drank her.
Isabel met a hideous giant,
Isabel continued self reliant.
The giant was hairy, the giant was horrid,
He had one eye in the middle of his forhead.
Good morning, Isabel, the giant said,
I’ll grind your bones to make my bread.
Isabel, Isabel, didn’t worry,
Isabel didn’t scream or scurry.
She nibled the zwieback that she always fed off,
And when it was gone, she cut the giant’s head off.
Isabel met a troublesome doctor,
He punched and he poked till he really shocked her.
The doctor’s talk was of coughs and chills
And the doctor’s satchel bulged with pills.
The doctor said unto Isabel,
Swallow this, it will make you well.
Isabel, Isabel, didn’t worry,
Isabel didn’t scream or scurry.
She took those pills from the pill concocter,
And Isabel calmly cured the doctor.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Ogden Nash's poem Adventures Of Isabel

5 Comments

  1. Mesha says:

    My 7th graders just studied this amazing poem and thought it was awesome in how each stanza introduces the 4 characters that Isabel encounters.

  2. Mell Darlington says:

    Why on earth has the copyright holder forbidden its use in this kind of site? I think this poem should be read to every little girl to instil in each the idea that they can be strong and independent.

  3. Eben Reilly says:

    As a writer who one day like Ogden will not be anything more than the books & poems I wrote & published– for public consumption!– I’d come back and raise hell for whoever kept my work out of
    the hands & minds of my readers!

  4. lucy christopher says:

    seeking inf: in which book (collection) does it appear?

  5. mary balan says:

    This seems like an extended limerick.

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