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Analysis and comments on The Four Winds by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Comment 8 of 8, added on February 27th, 2014 at 1:29 PM.
famiyow

I am addicted to chinese orientational seaweed soup.

Isaac Lou from Nigeria
Comment 7 of 8, added on February 27th, 2014 at 1:29 PM.
famiyow

I am addicted to chinese orientational seaweed soup.

Isaac Lou from Nigeria
Comment 6 of 8, added on February 27th, 2014 at 1:05 PM.
The Four Winds

I really enjoyed this forever long poem because of the adventures this long
poem held. At first, when I was reading this poem, I had no idea what was
going on in the poem and the plot and everything. I started to recognize
that this story was about the journey for the Legendary Belt of Wampum and
the the Great Bear in the Mountain was guarding it. I also think that the
four winds represent different way you can choose and the you must choose
one way.

Jonathan Kim from United States
Comment 5 of 8, added on March 22nd, 2013 at 12:09 AM.
The Four Winds

I think this poem is a inspirational poem. It shows that even simple
concepts such as the winds of nature can be intertwined with Native
American culture to make a wonderful poem. I think Longfellow probably took
inspiration from only Native American culture to come up with this poem.
The poem itself has a few different tones from my perspective. I think the
first part of the poem shows a triumphant tone. The part where Mudjekeewis
gives the three winds to his sons sends a dividing tone as well as a
powerful tone because the sons receive the a wind each and gain power to
that type of season. After that event, the poem talks about each son and
what he is in power of. For example, Wabun is in power of the season of
Spring. The poem also talks about what each of the sons experience and see.
For example, Wabun finds a beautiful maiden and soon turns her into the
Star of Morning, the Sun. That parts shows a loving tone. The scenes are
full of love except for Kabibonokka. Kabibonokka scene shows a dark tone
because Kabibonokka is trying to get rid of someone. I think this poem is
all about the Seasons and the winds. But it could also have a real life
implication. It could be compared to modern - day inheritance. When a
father of three sons dies, he might leave his fortune to his sons. In his
will, it will be written so that the three sons get equal shares of the
fortune. Overall, I like this poem and it is very inspirational. It has
many tones incorporated in it and is a very unique and interesting poem to
analyze and comment upon.

Sneha Krishnan (Robert C. Fisler School) from United States
Comment 4 of 8, added on March 19th, 2013 at 2:19 PM.
"The Four Winds"

At first when I read this poem I was a little confused, after I went back
and read it again I started to understand it a little. This is a poem about
the Four Winds: North, East, South, and West. The journey had all started
when Mudjekeewis defeated the Great Bear of the Mountain and brought back
the legendary Belt of Wampum to his tribe. His tribe named him the
West-Wind. They also changed Mudjekeewis’s name to Kabeyun. As for the
other three winds, Kabeyun gave them to his sons, “Unto Wabun gave the
East-Wind, Gave the South to Shawondasee, And the North-Wind, wild and
cruel, To the fierce Kabibonokka.” Then it starts to explain the other
three winds’ lives as they did their new duties of bringing the seasons and
such. Wabun was a handsome man and he brought the morning light as day
broke and spring with newborn birds. Kabibonokka was the fierce and
merciless winter wind that brought howling winds and blizzards. Shawondasee
was a soothing summer wind and very lazy, he brought summer to the people.
This could relate the real life. Although it cannot relate to my life
specifically it can relate to others. There could be a family where the
father had three sons and he divided the land he got from his friend with
them. As the father, he would keep the best land and gave the three sons
land according to their order of birth. It would then follow their lives as
they grew up and tried to woo women into their hands.

Sarah Nam(Fisler) from United States
Comment 3 of 8, added on March 19th, 2013 at 2:17 PM.
"The Four Winds"

At first when I read this poem I was a little confused, after I went back
and read it again I started to understand it a little. This is a poem about
the Four Winds: North, East, South, and West. The journey had all started
when Mudjekeewis defeated the Great Bear of the Mountain and brought back
the legendary Belt of Wampum to his tribe. His tribe named him the
West-Wind. They also changed Mudjekeewis’s name to Kabeyun. As for the
other three winds, Kabeyun gave them to his sons, “Unto Wabun gave the
East-Wind, Gave the South to Shawondasee, And the North-Wind, wild and
cruel, To the fierce Kabibonokka.” Then it starts to explain the other
three winds’ lives as they did their new duties of bringing the seasons and
such. Wabun was a handsome man and he brought the morning light as day
broke and spring with newborn birds. Kabibonokka was the fierce and
merciless winter wind that brought howling winds and blizzards. Shawondasee
was a soothing summer wind and very lazy, he brought summer to the people.
This could relate the real life. Although it cannot relate to my life
specifically it can relate to others. There could be a family where the
father had three sons and he divided the land he got from his friend with
them. As the father, he would keep the best land and gave the three sons
land according to their order of birth. It would then follow their lives as
they grew up and tried to woo women into their hands.

Sarah Nam(Fisler) from United States
Comment 2 of 8, added on March 19th, 2013 at 1:25 PM.
The Four Winds Interpretation


I was very astonished to see that there is 1,796 words in the poem, “ The
Four Winds.” This poem touched me because it was about regions and warriors
fighting with their lives in a battle. Fighting to wind, fighting with all
of their might. Risking their lives to save their country from darkness.
The animals that they killed so that they could eat them to stay alive they
needed. The indians are warriors using their lives to that they only have
one of. The west wind was the strongest. The east wind was the next
strongest and then the south and then the north. The warriors fought
through those winds to survive and to eat and to be warriors. The air had
its own power than it could unleash. Also, that they are gathering things
that they will need through the seasons to live through. That is what the
people are doing while the warriors are out fighting. The people are also
gathering herbs so that when they need to be in repair, they will be ready
to help and repair the warriors that are in danger of dying.

Karla Leonard from United States
Comment 1 of 8, added on May 24th, 2007 at 2:14 PM.

I really liked the poem, it really touched me. I can tell that this poem is
a sad one.

Eddy from United States

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Information about The Four Winds

Poet: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Poem: The Four Winds
Volume: The Song of Hiawatha
Added: Jun 9 2005
Viewed: 5194 times


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