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Analysis and comments on Blessing The Cornfields by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

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Comment 22 of 42, added on May 25th, 2013 at 6:17 PM.
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Comment 21 of 42, added on May 14th, 2013 at 9:21 AM.
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z61JXL Im grateful for the post.Really looking forward to read more. Will
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Comment 20 of 42, added on May 14th, 2013 at 12:58 AM.
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Comment 19 of 42, added on April 26th, 2013 at 4:48 AM.
Its always necessary keep your teeth clean

A tooth (plural teeth) is a undersized, calcified, whitish form initiate in
the jaws (or mouths) of many vertebrates and occupied to ease up down food.
Some animals, explicitly carnivores, also exercise teeth for hunting or
instead of defensive purposes. The roots of teeth are covered by gums.
Teeth are not made of bone, but fairly of multiple tissues of varying
density and hardness.

The ordinary make-up of teeth is similar across the vertebrates, although
there is respectable modifying in their form and position. The teeth of
mammals be struck by profound roots, and this design is also found in some
fish, and in crocodilians. In most teleost fish, however, the teeth are
spoken for to the outer rise of the bone, while in lizards they are fond of
to the inner come up of the jaw by way of a man side. In cartilaginous
fish, such as sharks, the teeth are attached by means of tough ligaments to
the hoops of cartilage that construct the jaw.





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Comment 18 of 42, added on March 19th, 2013 at 10:38 PM.
Blessing the Cornfields

Henry wrote this poem very well when i first clicked on the link to come
into the place where the poem was i scrolled down and saw amazingly how
long this poem was. At first I said to myself there is no way i am reading
this because it is so long but then i just got over how long it was and i
read the poem I am very glad I got over how long it was, Because it was an
amazing poem and i loved it so much. I Kind of thought the whole time I was
reading it that the Corn field meant so much to the Indians because that
was there food. Like we can go to the market whenever we want they had no
markets back then everyone had to live on their own and when someone stole
their food or something, Police would not show up on the scene because they
had no police back then. So what i am trying to get across here is that the
cornfield meant everything to the Indians and when someone or something
tried to take it they could not stand to watch. They Had do do something
and in this poem that something was done.

Jacob Herrera from United States
Comment 17 of 42, added on March 19th, 2013 at 11:14 AM.
Blessing the Cornfields

Blessing the Cornfields by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Is first of all very
rather long than most poems. However, he exchanges words with feelings and
emotions that we can comprehend too. In spite of the fact that the poem was
well written purposely in a long format. His vocabulary is exemplary, he
shows spectacularly how the the cornfields mean a lot to these Indians. He
shows how willing the Indians would take lengths too, for a cornfield.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, shows that the cornfield might mean nothing to
us, but to the Indians its like their world. The times in the story change
over the length of the poem goes on and on. It changes from spring to
summer. From the warmth of summer, they are ready to harvest their symbol
of victory. The cornfield. In the beginning of the story, the menacing
crows argue with the indians (metaphorically speaking). In the end, only
man survived. They kept the crows leader as a captive. This story shows how
a simple setting and event, can turn into a heroic battle against beasts.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow changes the simple event into a heroic,
descriptive, fight against nature event. From simply adding details, great
metaphors, and descriptive language. For us to feel in touch to our inner
warrior. Longfellow helps you find your inner warrior in this splendid
poem.

Elisa Kim
Comment 16 of 42, added on March 19th, 2013 at 10:58 AM.
Blessing the Cornfields

Blessing the Cornfields by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Is first of all very
rather long than most poems. However, he exchanges words with feelings and
emotions that we can comprehend too. In spite of the fact that the poem was
well written purposely in a long format. His vocabulary is exemplary, he
shows spectacularly how the the cornfields mean a lot to these Indians. He
shows how willing the Indians would take lengths too, for a cornfield.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, shows that the cornfield might mean nothing to
us, but to the Indians its like their world.

The times in the story change over the length of the poem goes on and on.
It changes from spring to summer. From the warmth of summer, they are ready
to harvest their symbol of victory. The cornfield. In the beginning of the
story, the menacing crows argue with the indians (metaphorically speaking).
In the end, only man survived. They kept the crows leader as a captive.

This story shows how a simple setting and event, can turn into a heroic
battle against beasts. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow changes the simple event
into a heroic, descriptive, fight against nature event. From simply adding
details, great metaphors, and descriptive language. For us to feel in touch
to our inner warrior. Longfellow helps you find your inner warrior in this
splendid poem.

Elisa Kim from United States
Comment 15 of 42, added on March 19th, 2013 at 10:58 AM.
Blessing the Cornfields

Blessing the Cornfields by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Is first of all very
rather long than most poems. However, he exchanges words with feelings and
emotions that we can comprehend too. In spite of the fact that the poem was
well written purposely in a long format. His vocabulary is exemplary, he
shows spectacularly how the the cornfields mean a lot to these Indians. He
shows how willing the Indians would take lengths too, for a cornfield.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, shows that the cornfield might mean nothing to
us, but to the Indians its like their world.
The times in the story change over the length of the poem goes on and on.
It changes from spring to summer. From the warmth of summer, they are ready
to harvest their symbol of victory. The cornfield. In the beginning of the
story, the menacing crows argue with the indians (metaphorically speaking).
In the end, only man survived. They kept the crows leader as a captive.
This story shows how a simple setting and event, can turn into a heroic
battle against beasts. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow changes the simple event
into a heroic, descriptive, fight against nature event. From simply adding
details, great metaphors, and descriptive language. For us to feel in touch
to our inner warrior. Longfellow helps you find your inner warrior in this
splendid poem.

Elisa Kim from United States
Comment 14 of 42, added on March 18th, 2013 at 1:32 PM.
Henry

Henry is a terrific writer. I can see the the poem come to life when I read
it. It was very fascinating I never thought that a poem can come to life
like that. Even though it was quiet long it was a interesting poem. I loved
reading that I would like to read it over and over again. I can hear the
screaming. After you read 2/3 of it you are in to it. It catches you and it
makes you read it is a marvelous poem I would keep this poem and read it
forever this is a spectacular poem by Henry Longfellow

Alexis {fisler} from United States
Comment 13 of 42, added on February 28th, 2013 at 1:41 PM.
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KEkmGt Say, you got a nice blog post.Thanks Again. Fantastic.

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Information about Blessing The Cornfields

Poet: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Poem: Blessing The Cornfields
Volume: The Song of Hiawatha
Added: Jun 9 2005
Viewed: 4271 times


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