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Analysis and comments on The Garret by Ezra Pound

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Comment 2 of 6, added on April 5th, 2006 at 9:01 PM.

This is my favorite poem. It has only 2 stanzas, but it says so much and
the image of the morning in the garret stays with the reader. Whenever I
am stuck in traffic or stressed out at work, I go to this poem as a "happy
place". The moment Pound describes is so real, and so fulfilling, and so
utterly without specifics. I first read this poem in high school, and I
knew that I would always love it, because the image is as attainable as it
is attractive. That bed is not out of reach for us. The poem doesn't
stipulate that it has to be a big fancy bed, or a large room, and the sun
can come in your window whether or not you have expensive drapes. Your
"desire" can be your husband, boyfriend, wife, girlfriend, anyone. It does
not say the gender or any comments on what the person looks like, only that
you desire that person. In order to have this perfect moment, all you need
is a bed, a partner, and a window. This perfect moment can come to you
whether you have butlers, friends, whether you are rich,poor, married or
unmarried. In this poem, Pound tells us that the titles and circumstances
that we think are important (in the first stanza) have actually no bearing
on whether or not we can be happy (the scene described in the second
stanza). It is a profound and welcome statement.

Mary
Comment 1 of 6, added on May 5th, 2005 at 10:51 PM.

Ezra Pound was a master of metonymy which is almost liek symbolism. in the
garret he mentions "unmarried and married" which encompasses the world's
population, minus pound and his lover or "friend" and "desire". Although
everyday many take a simple activity such as waking up next to their lover
for granted, Pound, in those final three lines, gives that moment more
value than anything else life has to offer. i think its a beautiful poem

Sarah from United States

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Information about The Garret

Poet: Ezra Pound
Poem: The Garret
Added: Feb 20 2003
Viewed: 16936 times


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