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December 19th, 2014 - we have 234 poets, 8,025 poems and 279,673 comments.
Analysis and comments on A Girl by Ezra Pound

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Comment 25 of 155, added on November 28th, 2005 at 11:15 AM.

Isn't Ezra a womans Name???

Mishcie from Chile
Comment 24 of 155, added on November 23rd, 2005 at 9:12 PM.

"all this is folly to the world"
that is the center of the poem to me and what i want to understand.
Pound describes his feelings about the subject of his poem, the little
girl, by comparing her to a tree. He takes her in his hands literally
(that is how i read it) and it suggests to me that he is taking care of
her. But the image of the sap ascending his arms becomes more ominous. Then
the idea of the tree (child) penetrating him, becomes stranger and more
ominous still such that branches grow from his arms. Is he saying that he
feels so responsible for her or is so moved by her that she has become a
part of him? By the end of the poem
she is everything: the tree. the moss. the violets with wind blowing above
them. These are beautiful images but the last line, again, turns
foreboding: "and all this is folly to the world". The power and beauty of
a girl is what makes the world fall and sin. Pound's point of view could
be viewed as ambiguous. He loves and hates the little girl.

amy Correia from United States
Comment 23 of 155, added on October 18th, 2005 at 6:11 PM.

i don't get it


Gladys Lopez from United States
Comment 22 of 155, added on October 11th, 2005 at 10:12 PM.

a touching moving poem ( i also had been thinking that pound was a woman)

mohamad from Morocco
Comment 21 of 155, added on August 26th, 2005 at 10:54 AM.

it is not just 'folly' as Pound said but a mirracle of life that a child
can be like a tree that grows out of a parent body. First, it is just a sap
but soon it takes all the strentgh from it and overgrows the parential
tree... Well, sometimes the child can suck all the 'juice' out of its
parent. But here Pound seems to enjoy it.

agi from Poland
Comment 20 of 155, added on August 24th, 2005 at 7:45 PM.

It seems to me as if Mr. Pound is describing the pounding of Mr. Pounds
pud, which he so convientently terms a "tree." Ha! You wish! Pound, old
boy! More like a twig, I would imagine. To each his own, I suppose.

Brother Geo from United States
Comment 19 of 155, added on August 10th, 2005 at 5:47 PM.

Yes, right, see Paul Bard's comment #11; the girl is being pursued and
changing into a tree to elude her persuer. This poem may make the most
sense if you read the first stanza as the words of the girl as she is
changing, the second as the words of the guy who loves her but can't quite
catch up.
The fun thing about Pound is how he has so much other literature in his
mind as he writes. He's great on his own but gets even better once you
figure out what he's referring to. In "Metamorphoses," The Roman poet Ovid
told the story of Daphne, daughter of a river god. She was beautiful but
shunned all suitors. One day Apollo, the sun god, saw her when she was
hunting in the woods. He followed her but she was a fast runner, and fled.
He called and called but she wouldn't stop, and for a long time he couldn't
catch her; nymphs like Daphne knew it was too risky to have a god for a
lover. As she approached the river she felt his breath on her neck, called
out to her father for help, and immediately she began changing into a
laurel tree. Apollo watched the change with dismay and grief. Pound seems
to add a hint of self-disgust in there too: "And all this is folly to the
world." Kind of like, what a waste. But still she's beautiful, even as a
plant. And all this in ten quick lines! For more on the Daphne story, see
if your library has "Mythology," by Edith Hamilton, & check out p. 155.

Tom Rea from United States
Comment 18 of 155, added on July 22nd, 2005 at 12:52 PM.

only men with imagery think this awesome or else it could just be another
"folly to the world"

YEPWI DANIEL from Nigeria
Comment 17 of 155, added on June 13th, 2005 at 5:42 AM.

Exactly.What we really wanna write in our poems can only exist in imagnary
world n when we have finished writing a poem n come back to the real world,
it seems like whatever we have written will look foolish to the people who
will read it.But that carries a very moralic lesson.

Anne from Pakistan
Comment 16 of 155, added on May 19th, 2005 at 6:53 PM.

Ok...fist of this poet is a guy Natalie, if you would look at the huge
picture it gives you above the poems you might notice this fact. Thats all
I got.

John from Grenada

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Information about A Girl

Poet: Ezra Pound
Poem: A Girl
Added: Feb 4 2004
Viewed: 1753 times
Poem of the Day: Oct 4 2000


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