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Analysis and comments on I robbed the Woods by Emily Dickinson

Comment 10 of 10, added on December 21st, 2014 at 7:50 AM.
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Comment 9 of 10, added on December 21st, 2014 at 7:28 AM.
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Comment 8 of 10, added on March 30th, 2014 at 5:33 AM.
Test, just a test

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XRumerTest from Turks and Caicos Islands
Comment 7 of 10, added on April 17th, 2006 at 4:55 PM.

This poem struck a completely different cord in me than what others
portrayed in their comments, and that is why I felt compelled to write
this. When I think of robbing the woods I think of how many things that
the woods provide that I take with me once I leave them. For instance,
acorns, rocks, sticks, leaves, and all of the other little treasures that
the woods leave for passer-by's to take, act as souvenirs. Perhaps Emily
Dickinson felt that the trees did not intensionally leave these trinkets
for her, and so maybe occasionally she felt greedy or guilty for taking
them.

Jeannine from United States
Comment 6 of 10, added on February 28th, 2006 at 5:47 PM.

i loved this poem due to the comparison done!!!!

lalalala
Comment 5 of 10, added on November 19th, 2005 at 8:30 AM.

I think she meens we destory the woods witch have done nothing to us

acire from United States
Comment 4 of 10, added on June 12th, 2005 at 7:59 PM.

I wonder if Emily Dickinson was talking about the idea that whatever we
touch in life, we change it forever. When she talks about even the moss, I
think she means that what we do in life can make the most profound changes,
changes that we may not ever envision or realize. Maybe I robbed the Woods
because I altered them from what they were or could have been.

Sally Crabb from United States
Comment 3 of 10, added on October 30th, 2004 at 10:22 PM.

CAPS USE DUE TO POOR VISION

EACH TIME I POST A COMMENT ON A WEB, I LET MY FINGERS
DO THE THINKING. THE COMMENT APPEARS, STRONGLY INDICATING THAT LITTLE OR
NO THOUGHT WAS USED BEFORE
THE PERSON STARTED WRITING.
FINALLY, I STOPPED AND THOUGHT ABOUT WHAT I WAS GOING
TO WRITE, IT IS ABOUT TIME.
WHEN MISS EMILY BECOMES CONFUSING, CHANGE THE LINE ORDER:

THE TRUSTING WOODS.
THE UNSUSPECTING TREES
MY FANTASY TO PLEASE.
BROUGHT OUT THEIR BURS AND MOSSES
I SCANNED THEIR TRINKETS CURIOUS-
I GRASPED-I BORE AWAY
I ROBBED THE WOODS-
WHAT WILL THE SOLEMN HEMLOCK-
WHAT WILL THE OAK TREE SAY

MISS EMILY IS INVOLVING THE READER IN HER FANTASY OF OBTAINING POISON FROM
THE WOODS.
SHE REFUSED TO BE SPECIFIC ON WHAT SHE INTENDS TO DO
WITH THE HEMLOCK, BUT BY IDENTIFYING HERSELF AS A ROBBER, IT SHOULD BE
APPARENT THAT THE HEMLOCK WAS NOT TO USED FOR A BEIGN PURPOSE.
ALTERING THE LINE ORDER SHOULD CLARIFY THAT MISS EMILY'S ASSOCITION WITH
NATURE SERVED MANY PURPOSES, SOME LESS THAN LEGAL; HOWEVER, THIS IS ONLY A
FANTASY-RIGHT?

MS. EMILY WAS FULLY AWARE THAT NATURE HAD A CARNIVOROUS ASPECT,AND NATURE,
IN HER ERA,WAS ALSO USED AS A PHARMACY. HER BIRD AND BEE POEMS ARE NOT AS
INNOCENT AS ASSUMED.

MISS EMILY WILL OBLIQUE YOU WITHOUT A MOMENT'S HESITATION,IT WAS IN HER
NATURE.

jerry garner from United States
Comment 2 of 10, added on October 30th, 2004 at 8:53 PM.

CAPS USED-POOR VISION

WHILE I AGREE WITH MOST OF COMMENT # 3, NEVER FORGET
WHATEVER MISS E. WROTE, DUPLICITY WAS NEVER FAR AWAY. IS E' ATTEMPTING TO
GET YOUR MIND TURNED TO THE DIRECTION OF EVIL INTENT?
DID SHE COME INTO THE WOODS FOR ENJOYMENT OR TO ROB-WAS SHE SEEKING A ITEM
FOR POISONOUS NEEDS? IF SHE OBTAINED SUCH AN ITEM FROM THE TRUSTING WOODS,
WHO WOULD EVER KNOW?
I ROBBED THE WOODS
THE TRUSTING WOODS
..................
WHAT WILL THE SOLEMN HEMLOCK-
WHAT WILL THE OAK TREE SAY

THE HEMLOCK HAS A WILL, A METHOD OF BEHAVIOR, A USE, OF ITS OWN AND CAN
FOLLOW ANY DIRECTION, BENIGH OR EVIL?
MISS E' IS REMINDING US THAT THE PERSON
THAT ROBBED THE WOODS, SOUGHT HEMLOCK FOR A SPECIFIC
PURPOSE. SHE DOES NOT SPECIFY WHAT THAT REASON WAS, ONLY THE OAK TREE
WILL HAVE KNOWLEDGE THAT SUCH AN EVENT OCCURRED AND OAK TREES HAVE LITTLE
TO SAY.
MISS E'S OFTEN WROTE WITH MORE THAN ONE GOAL, LEAVING
ROOM FOR SEVERAL INTERPRETATION. DUPLICITY WAS ONLY
ONE OF HER TECHNIQUES.
DID SHE ENTER THE WOODS WITH NEFARIOUS INTENT?
MISS E' WANTS THAT IDEA TO BRUSH AGAINST THE READERS MIND, HOW MANY OTHER
AVENUES SHE WANTS THE READER TO
TRAVEL OR OPEN TO DEBATE.


jerry garner from United States
Comment 1 of 10, added on October 26th, 2004 at 2:08 PM.

I think it means the poet enjoys, or enjoyed the beauty of the forest
without robbing it of anything. She took away indelible memories of happy
times in the woods. What would the solemn Hemlock and the Oak say? They
would say "Ah, we are loved, and that without being reduced to something
different from what we were originally."

Audren Glass from United States

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Information about I robbed the Woods

Poet: Emily Dickinson
Poem: 41. I robbed the Woods
Volume: Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
Year: 1955
Added: Jan 9 2004
Viewed: 14538 times
Poem of the Day: Feb 17 2002


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