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Analysis and comments on There is a solitude of space by Emily Dickinson

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Comment 24 of 564, added on February 20th, 2008 at 9:53 PM.

This poem was very well written. It has a very powerful word choice. In the
beginning I believe that by saying, "A solitude of death, but these
Society shall be", Dickinson was saying that loneliness caused by loss of a
loved one is a part of life. I think she was mourning when she wrote this.

Jacquie from United States
Comment 23 of 564, added on February 20th, 2008 at 3:16 PM.

I think that this poem represents how the mind and soul that is admitted to
itself has no limits. This poem shows that if you take the time to examine
your soul and figure out who you really are, your mind will take you where
ever you want to go. "A soul admitted to itself" is one that is examined
and completely understood by the person. She also explains how "polar
privacy" is essential in examination of the mind and soul. The message that
Dickinson is conveying is that solitude and isolation are key in finding
your true self.

Jack Phillip-Reynolds Culler
Comment 22 of 564, added on February 20th, 2008 at 3:06 PM.

My idea of "There is a solitude of space" is that while being lonely you
can experience your own true self. It spoke to me in a sense that you could
be in a room with hundreds of people and still feel like a puny mouse stuck
in the corner with no one to talk to. Although, while being lonely you can
discover who you really are, what you are all about. When we hang out with
other people they kind of rub off on us and we are never who we really
are... unless we are solitude. "A soul admitted to itself," means you are
who you are from the inside out or the outside in, either way you will
always be YOU! The word solitude spoke out to me also, being to yourself
and withdrawn from society. :)

Sarah Vaughan from United States
Comment 21 of 564, added on February 20th, 2008 at 3:01 PM.

Loneliness is the greatest solitude. However, one can be lonely and at
peace. The poem represents the vastness of silence, peace, and solitude.
Though being alone can be taken as isolated and out-of-reach of the world,
it can also represent the time needed for someone to understand life and
their surroundings. The solitude of "a soul admitted to itself" is simply
silence and peace in society and especially onesself, which may eventually
be disrupted unlike the infinite solitude found among space, the sea, and
ultimately, death. "Finite infinity" can be seen by some as impossible,
but in itself, it means solitude. The vast possibilities that are seen
through lonely isolation can be good or bad. The result depends on the
person and what they do with their tie alone, free from stress, pressure,
and life in general.

Jessica Cayce from United States
Comment 20 of 564, added on February 19th, 2008 at 11:37 AM.

this poem is very interesting. i think Emily Dickenson is telling us to
appreciate out solitary times that we have with ourselves. i believe that
she is contrasting relative privacy and eternal privacy. for example when
she says "There is a solitude of space
A solitude of sea
A solitude of death, but these
Society shall be", i think that she is talking about the peace and
tranquility we may experience daily when we are by ourselves. but when she
says "A solitude of death , but these Society shal be", this is eternal
loneliness which happens when we die. this is really expressed when it says
"A soul admitted to itself--Finite infinity", shows us that death is when
we are finally alone forever.

this is something that many of us fear. when we lose a loved one in death
we feel lonley. and i think this is what dickenson was expressing in her
poetry. she may have been going through a rough time when she wrote this
poem.


karen from United States
Comment 19 of 564, added on February 19th, 2008 at 11:13 AM.

Well, here is my idea of the message. I believe that Emily Dickinson was
trying to say that when you lokk at space for some time, you tend to get an
idea that this space is something very desolate, very lonely. She also says
that:
"A solitude of death, but these
Society shall be"
I belive that what she means is that society will become just like death's
solitude: cold, baren, and alone. And when she puts Finite and Infinity
together, it sounds very ironic, but slightly redundant. She also says:
"That polar privacy
A soul admitted to itself"
This suggests a bit of a mysterious felling around this statement, because,
how can a soul be admitted onto itself? Sounds like a bit of an oxymoron in
there, if you ask me.

Patrick from United States
Comment 18 of 564, added on February 15th, 2008 at 11:12 AM.

Dickinson talks about solitude and loneliness and how it affects the mind,
but in an abstract and vague way. Her use of metaphors like space and sea
make it a little easier to understand her way of thinking.

elexis and alexandra from United States
Comment 17 of 564, added on February 15th, 2008 at 9:55 AM.

I get a unique message from this poem. After I read the poem for the third
time I realized that Dickinson describes many different degrees of
solitude. Space, to me, is like looking from the outside in. You are
looking in on the world and everyone elses conflicting issues and using
them as examples on how to fix yourself. The sea, to me, is like a calm,
relaxing solitude. It is the kind of solitude you experience when you take
a day and go to the beach. You are not isolating yourself from the world,
and if you are you are giving yourself time to think and breathe. However
death, to me, is the ultimate isolation. Your life is very precious. You
can have all the solitude in world, but if you do not have your life you
cannot have the same solitude. For instance if you believe in Heaven, you
are going to be with God and all the angels when your times is over in this
world, on the downside if you go to hell, you are going to have solitude,
but in a painful manner. So death is a crazy way to describe solitude. " A
soul admitted to itself--Finite Infinity" appeals to me. You have no limits
as it says and are free to do whatever you please. You have endless
possiblities when you isolate yourself, I disagree, you cannot feel love,
you will not let love in. To me you can never be completly solitude. The
word "Death" however makes my mind cringe. People will do anything to let
go of their problems, but even death, the ulitimate solitude, you are still
not alone.

Heather Bishop from United States
Comment 16 of 564, added on February 15th, 2008 at 9:42 AM.

I get a unique message from this poem. After I read the poem for the third
time I realized that Dickinson describes many different degrees of
solitude. Space, to me, is like looking from the outside in. You are
looking in on the world and everyone elses conflicting issues and using
them as examples on how to fix yourself. The sea, to me, is like a calm,
relaxing solitude. It is the kind of solitude you experience when you take
a day and go to the beach. You are not isolating yourself from the world,
and if you are you are giving yourself time to think and breathe. However
death, to me, is the ultimate isolation. Your life is very precious. You
can have all the solitude in world, but if you do not have your life you
cannot have the same solitude. For instance if you believe in Heaven, you
are going to be with God and all the angels when your times is over in this
world, on the downside if you go to hell, you are going to have solitude,
but in a painful manner. So death is a crazy way to describe solitude. " A
soul admitted to itself--Finite Infinity" appeals to me. You have no limits
as it says and are free to do whatever you please. You have endless
possiblities when you isolate yourself, I disagree, you cannot feel love,
you will not let love in. To me you can never be completly solitude. The
word "Death" however makes my mind cringe. People will do anything to let
go of their problems, but even death, the ulitimate solitude, you are still
not alone.

Heather Bishop from United States
Comment 15 of 564, added on March 14th, 2007 at 7:16 PM.

Yeh....I live in North Agusta and I had to do this lame ass poem for my
project. What the hell!!! This thing is so god damn hard to comprehend.
Emily Dick, if your out there looking down on this message, just wnna let u
know im gnna rekill you if you come back to life so no one ever has to
translate one of the fking poems again! BAM! take taht Dickinson! oober
poonage

Jonny T. from United States

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Information about There is a solitude of space

Poet: Emily Dickinson
Poem: 1695. There is a solitude of space
Volume: Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
Year: 1955
Added: Jan 9 2004
Viewed: 422 times
Poem of the Day: Feb 8 2004


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