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Analysis and comments on Tell all the Truth but tell it slant -- by Emily Dickinson

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Comment 35 of 385, added on March 18th, 2010 at 5:33 PM.

Sango and others, Please take another look at this poem. I dont think that
what Emily is saying is that God is not real. In fact i am not sure she is
talking about God at all. But if she were refering to God as Truth I think
what she is saying is that He can be overwhemlming at times. I know when i
think about God i am overwhelmed by God's holiness because of the sin in my
life. I think its this sensation that Emily could be talking about in the
poem. Please consider the posibility that there is God, because i know
there is,and he is a loving and just one, and what are the consequences of
believing there is no God if their really is?


Comment 34 of 385, added on January 16th, 2010 at 7:06 AM.
tell all the truth

Hi,
please couldn't anybody help me with the suggested meaning of the truths
Dickinson is writing about? Could those be religious truths? Or generelly?

P.S. We have to write an interpretation as a homework for school.

Anežka from Czech Republic
Comment 33 of 385, added on October 20th, 2009 at 4:45 PM.

hmm... im thinking whoever thinks this poem is about god is kinda dumb.
just because she is a religous woman doesnt mean its gotta be about god.
come on people not everything in life is about religion

Dustin
Comment 32 of 385, added on May 25th, 2009 at 11:35 AM.

In a simpler explanation, Dickinson is all about the use of words, and her
ability to pick a simple word, and choose another resembling the same
meaning. Her poetry can be interpreted easily, but her wording is what
makes is so difficult. The first line "Tell all the Truth but tell it
slant"- her punctuation and capitalization is still unknown, we do not
necessarily know the reasoning for all of her punctuation, but we should
believe that the topic of the poem is about truth, when telling the truth,
it is always easier to fluff if a little, if it is harmful to someone,
instead of telling it "straight" on- Dickinson says to "tell it slant",
perhaps meaning that the truth is easier to handle if not all told at once.
"Success in Circuit lies"- it is easier to slowly tell the truth and take
extra time or "laps" in a circuit to tell the truth, slow and steady wins
the race, and by slowing circling around the truth, it will be easier to
overcome. "Too bright for our inform Delight"- the truth can be too much to
handle, or "too bright", depending on the harshness or happiness that comes
from it, our "inform Delight" (ego) can only handle so much. "The Truth's
superb surprise"- some may be suprised if told at once, and this leads into
the next line "As Lightening to the Children eased"- as children, it is
harder to understand teh reality of life, and the truth behind
circumstances. Children tend to have a harder time understanding the truth,
and it is more shocking (relating to lightning) for children when they
uncover the truth behind something. But "With explanation kind"-
explanation for children can help ease children into understand why
something is the way it is, and that the truth is not always an easy thing
to handle. "The Truth must dazzle gradually"- it is easier for the truth to
be gradually told, if it dazzles all at once, it can be too much to handle-
a gradual introduction to the truth will help people to understand the
meaning behind it. "Or every man be blind"- if it the truth is told
straight on, with no "slant"- the "dazzling" meaning behind it may blind or
crush someone, accepting the truth completely can harm people and cause
alot of pain if bluntly revealed.
Hope this helps!

Elizabeth from United States
Comment 31 of 385, added on May 25th, 2009 at 11:13 AM.

In a simpler explanation, Dickinson is all about the use of words, and her
ability to pick a simple word, and choose another resembling the same
meaning. Her poetry can be interpreted easily, but her wording is what
makes is so difficult. The first line "Tell all the Truth but tell it
slant"- her punctuation and capitalization is still unknown, we do not
necessarily know the reasoning for all of her punctuation, but we should
believe that the topic of the poem is about truth, when telling the truth,
it is always easier to fluff if a little, if it is harmful to someone,
instead of telling it "straight" on- Dickinson says to "tell it slant",
perhaps meaning that the truth is easier to handle if not all told at once.
"Success in Circuit lies"- it is easier to slowly tell the truth and take
extra time or "laps" in a circuit to tell the truth, slow and steady wins
the race, and by slowing circling around the truth, it will be easier to
overcome. "Too bright for our inform Delight"- the truth can be too much to
handle, or "too bright", depending on the harshness or happiness that comes
from it, our "inform Delight" (ego) can only handle so much. "The Truth's
superb surprise"- some may be suprised if told at once, and this leads into
the next line "As Lightening to the Children eased"- as children, it is
harder to understand teh reality of life, and the truth behind
circumstances. Children tend to have a harder time understanding the truth,
and it is more shocking (relating to lightning) for children when they
uncover the truth behind something. But "With explanation kind"-
explanation for children can help ease children into understand why
something is the way it is, and that the truth is not always an easy thing
to handle. "The Truth must dazzle gradually"- it is easier for the truth to
be gradually told, if it dazzles all at once, it can be too much to handle-
a gradual introduction to the truth will help people to understand the
meaning behind it. "Or every man be blind"- if it the truth is told
straight on, with no "slant"- the "dazzling" meaning behind it may blind or
crush someone, accepting the truth completely can harm people and cause
alot of pain if bluntly revealed.
Hope this helps!

Elizabeth Gollin from United States
Comment 30 of 385, added on February 5th, 2009 at 9:54 AM.

i think that this is a ok poem but what do she really means an sometimes
when she is wirting it can be can of carzy to me but i think i have to now
more about poetry!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

valencia Johnson from United States
Comment 29 of 385, added on January 28th, 2009 at 10:04 PM.

Jerry Garcia... I totally agree. I hate poetry.

But i agree that this is about confrontation and go it must be done
carefully

Lauren R from United States
Comment 28 of 385, added on January 26th, 2009 at 1:41 PM.

For all those who are saying that Emily Dickinson is pointing out that
there is no God in this poem, take a look at her background. Dickinson is a
very religious woman and most of her poems are about death and God. The
reason she writes about death is because she does not see it as a bad
thing. She sees is as a gift from God. Because of the views that she takes
from Thoreau and those like him, she believes that during life, we continue
to disappoint God. But in death, we go to Heaven and will be with God where
we cannot sin against him and therefore cannot disappoint him.

So, if she believes all of this, the poem obviously does not say that there
is no God. She believes way too much to say that.

Kelsey from United States
Comment 27 of 385, added on November 10th, 2008 at 11:47 AM.

comment 23 is the most correct. Thanks Not a Moron!

mike from United States
Comment 26 of 385, added on June 17th, 2008 at 7:18 PM.

HOW CAN ONE SUPPORT THE IDEA ABOUT THE POEM INTERPRETATION AS GIVEN ABOVE?

NAHSON KABUYAYA from Congo, Democratic Republic of

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Information about Tell all the Truth but tell it slant --

Poet: Emily Dickinson
Poem: 1129. Tell all the Truth but tell it slant --
Volume: Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
Year: 1955
Added: Jan 9 2004
Viewed: 10927 times
Poem of the Day: Dec 17 2002


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By: Emily Dickinson

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