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Analysis and comments on We outgrow love, like other things by Emily Dickinson

[1] 2

Comment 14 of 14, added on December 19th, 2013 at 11:26 PM.
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Seemiasmove from Indonesia
Comment 13 of 14, added on December 18th, 2013 at 10:34 PM.
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BrorgeBruix from Romania
Comment 12 of 14, added on December 18th, 2013 at 5:25 AM.
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Lienissuend from Croatia
Comment 11 of 14, added on December 18th, 2013 at 4:20 AM.
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KirlPrirtiexy from United Kingdom
Comment 10 of 14, added on December 17th, 2013 at 10:43 PM.
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versekVeisk from Italy
Comment 9 of 14, added on December 17th, 2013 at 6:45 PM.
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Infitaoffinee from Faroe Islands
Comment 8 of 14, added on December 12th, 2009 at 3:00 PM.
Love

Yes we do outgrow it when our hearts can no longer take the break it has
brought.

Amy from United States
Comment 7 of 14, added on December 8th, 2009 at 7:35 PM.

In this poem, Emily Dickinson compares love to clothes that you
eventually,but they hold such sentimental value that you do not want to
throw them out.

Donnie from Saint Vincent and the Grenadin
Comment 6 of 14, added on October 27th, 2008 at 8:47 PM.

In this poem, I think Emily Dickinson is comparing the poem to clothes, and
is using the perspective of a person who does not believe in expressing
love all the time. "We outgrow love, like other things And put it in the
Drawer." this means that one gets tired of love and stows it away, just
like a person would if they had clothes that were too small or out of
fashion, but didn't have the heart to throw them out. "Till it an Antique
fashion shows Like Costumes Grandsires wore." This means that the person
would then express love again from time to time, like taking out clothes of
an antique fashion, to try them on again.

Sacha Gafinowitz from United States
Comment 5 of 14, added on October 20th, 2007 at 7:42 AM.

The poet tries to tell that as we experience and discover somethings, which
once seemed very unreachable, start to be an ordinary thing in time.
Dickinson uses the word "antique" not as a "priceless" but rather "an
ordinary" thing.

zuhal from Turkey

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Information about We outgrow love, like other things

Poet: Emily Dickinson
Poem: 887. We outgrow love, like other things
Volume: Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
Year: 1955
Added: Jan 9 2004
Viewed: 10984 times


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