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Analysis and comments on I dreaded that first Robin, so, by Emily Dickinson

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Comment 38 of 408, added on August 9th, 2011 at 6:13 AM.
ScadayNeafe

Hello I enjoyed yoiur article. I think you have some good ideas and
everytime i learn something new i dont think it will ever stop always new
info , Thanks for all of your hard work!.

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Comment 37 of 408, added on August 8th, 2011 at 1:04 AM.
ScadayNeafe

Hello I enjoyed yoiur article. I think you have some good ideas and
everytime i learn something new i dont think it will ever stop always new
info , Thanks for all of your hard work!.

LaxyGapekep from United States
Comment 36 of 408, added on August 8th, 2011 at 1:04 AM.
ScadayNeafe

Hello I enjoyed yoiur article. I think you have some good ideas and
everytime i learn something new i dont think it will ever stop always new
info , Thanks for all of your hard work!.

LaxyGapekep from United States
Comment 35 of 408, added on August 6th, 2011 at 10:44 PM.
ScadayNeafe

Hello I enjoyed yoiur article. I think you have some good ideas and
everytime i learn something new i dont think it will ever stop always new
info , Thanks for all of your hard work!.

LaxyGapekep from United States
Comment 34 of 408, added on August 6th, 2011 at 10:44 PM.
ScadayNeafe

Hello I enjoyed yoiur article. I think you have some good ideas and
everytime i learn something new i dont think it will ever stop always new
info , Thanks for all of your hard work!.

LaxyGapekep from United States
Comment 33 of 408, added on July 26th, 2011 at 9:12 PM.
Test, just a testcv

Please one more post about that.I wonder how you got so good. This is
really a fascinating blog, lots of stuff thcat I can get into. One thing I
just want to say is that your Blog is so perfect

VexceatiaLNic from United States
Comment 32 of 408, added on July 26th, 2011 at 9:12 PM.
Test, just a testcv

Please one more post about that.I wonder how you got so good. This is
really a fascinating blog, lots of stuff thcat I can get into. One thing I
just want to say is that your Blog is so perfect

VexceatiaLNic from United States
Comment 31 of 408, added on April 6th, 2011 at 10:47 AM.
#348

To the comment # 22 I disagree, Emily Dickinson, never married!

Aurora roman from United States
Comment 30 of 408, added on July 29th, 2010 at 10:18 PM.

The spring comes back in triumph to me, its humble queen.

frumpo from United States
Comment 29 of 408, added on December 2nd, 2009 at 11:35 AM.

It is easy to read this poem in any number of ways, as it is for all of
Dickinson's poems -- that's why we love them so much! :) -- but perhaps it
should be read both ways.

Dickinson lost several people very close to her, and a poem about
bereavement would not be amiss. If you read it as spring embodying life,
then spring would be a sort of slap to the face if she has just experienced
a painful death. She is mourning, and in pain, but the rest of the world is
laughing at her, and proceeding on with spring ... "They're here, though;
not a creature failed - / No Blossom stayed away / In gentle deference to
me - / The Queen of Calvary - "

Dickinson was not particularly religious, so the reference to Calvary, the
place of Jesus's crucifixion, is probably a parallel to death and not
religion. If applied in that light, she would appear to be saying, "All I
know is death. I'm still in mourning, I haven't moved on ... and yet spring
comes anyway, it cares nothing for my own sorrows."

However -- it if you read it as Robin is a man, not a bird, the meaning
changes full circle. (Readings of this sort can be seen with "I like a look
of Agony" as well.) It could be read as a sexual relationship from start to
finish, but it would have to be a fairly unfortunate one, for the ending,
"Each one salutes me, as he goes," would imply that it was a casual
encounter that meant more for her than it did for Robin.

If it is read as purely a relationship, it fits a little better with the
story of Dickinson's life. There is evidence that she was in love, perhaps
several times, but no indications that these relationships where ever
actuated, much less made physical. The dread of the first Robin could be
seen as the uncertainty of her first true relationship, and a belief that
if she could bear the first awkward phase, that it would be better
afterward. The Daffodils could be other women or friends who disapprove of
her choice, the Grass stanza a wish for him to come and see her. The Bees
could be a metaphor for "busy-bees," or gossips, who care little about her
and are only interested in the drama. They came anyway, though, and she is
hurt by them. Possibly this is a reference to these Bees ruining
everything, or ending in some way the relationship with Robin.

There are a thousand ways to read this, and all have their merits ... these
are the readings I feel have the most evidence to support them. :)

Sara from United States

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Information about I dreaded that first Robin, so,

Poet: Emily Dickinson
Poem: 348. I dreaded that first Robin, so,
Volume: Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
Year: 1955
Added: Jan 9 2004
Viewed: 29829 times
Poem of the Day: Nov 27 2002


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