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Analysis and comments on The Soul selects her own Society by Emily Dickinson

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Comment 8 of 138, added on June 20th, 2005 at 10:21 AM.

On the surface this poem does appear to be a poem of opening her heart, but
I believe that it has a different meaning then this. "divine Majority"
"Chariots" ect. these are all words of the heavens. The concept of faith
and doubt arises in this poem. In this time it was wrong to have doubt that
god really existed, but this issue had just started to arise in her time
period. I think that this poem is telling about her struggle to be like
everyone else but everything that people say to her and present to her so
that she would believe in god has no effect. She is "Unmoved" but she also
knows that she must "Choose One" or the other to believe or not. I think
that she is choosing not to believe in this poem.

amanda from United States
Comment 7 of 138, added on March 2nd, 2005 at 5:15 PM.

I find this poem to be darker and more condescending that what the comments
on this board might suggest. From my perspective, the poem comes across to
me as the narrator being victim of one too many broken hearts, especially
with the last stanza. She has become very selective of the individuals she
allows in her life. She's "unmoved" to so many- even an emperor!

But this is one man's evaluation.

evilpanda from United States
Comment 6 of 138, added on February 3rd, 2005 at 11:23 AM.

This is a well-thought out poem. Emily Dickinson is an amazing writer. The
use of persona tells how the soul is feeling and that it doesn't matter if
you are in the higher society or the lower society, the soul will choose
who can enter the door.

Elise from United States
Comment 5 of 138, added on January 18th, 2005 at 12:50 AM.

comments 1-4, all have some validity.
comment 2, CONDESCENDING-key word
not meeting the emperor is noted, In life, when the
king or emperor comes calling, you (we common folk) go
out to meet him-why does emily stay in the house (it is
not the 'stonem not yet anyway)
okay, more hints, the emperor is kneeling (isn't that
peculiar? why, would an emperor be kneeling (condescending? perhaps, what
circumstance would require an emperor to bow?
What personage would requie the Queen of England to bow?
(same deal)
You, the reader, have a seat at an event, what is the event.
don't seek an answer, let it come without pressure.

It took me years to figure this out, after reading many
of emily's bio. come on, stretch that gray machine.

old eyes from United States
Comment 4 of 138, added on January 12th, 2005 at 7:25 AM.

I feel that this poem should not be taken at face value. It is clear that
Dickinson has exprienced a love which even an 'Emperor' can not penetrate.
Her 'low gate' is humble in his wake. However the concluding dash, 'Like
Stone-' hints that this may not be such an exlusive relionship, in fact the
poem could begin again with 'I've known her' indicating that this happened
before. The harsh capital in 'Stone' maybe her own feelings at being on the
recieving end of rejection. The isolated '-shuts the Door-'
evokes similer feelings. Dickinson mingles rejection and exclusive love to
this poem, wheather souls 'Valves of.. attention' are closed for ever is
debatable

Ellie from United Kingdom
Comment 3 of 138, added on December 13th, 2004 at 2:08 PM.

I believe this is one of Emily Dickinson's more emotional poems. It tells
of true love either for a friend or soulmate. When choosing a friend or
soulmate you have the entire world to choose from, or an ample nation, and
a person doesn't worry about their status when choosing a friend (The soul
remains unmoved even while the emperor is kneeling at her gate). This is
such a well written poem. It accurately describes the soul's unaltered
decision while choosing a companion in life.

Karianne from United States
Comment 2 of 138, added on November 6th, 2004 at 5:38 PM.

This is one of my favorites by Emily. I like her somewhat ironic and
condescending second stanza, about how her soul will not open herself to
just anyone, no matter their rank. It's true, too--no one can like
everyone, and one only feels close to few.

Raven from Canada
Comment 1 of 138, added on November 1st, 2004 at 2:40 PM.

this poem is a great poem that was writin by a strange dauthor with mental
isues. she is inside looking at the emporer at her lower gate now wouldn't
you normaly go down and meet the emporer at the gate. that does not seem
right. i am doing a paper on this poem for english class and i have alot of
things to say about it that i wont
-samantha miller

Samantha Miller from United States

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Information about The Soul selects her own Society

Poet: Emily Dickinson
Poem: 303. The Soul selects her own Society
Volume: Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
Year: 1955
Added: Jan 9 2004
Viewed: 1656 times
Poem of the Day: Jul 2 2008


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