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Analysis and comments on Safe in their Alabaster Chambers by Emily Dickinson

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Comment 22 of 22, added on August 2nd, 2013 at 11:33 AM.
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Comment 21 of 22, added on August 2nd, 2013 at 11:33 AM.
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Comment 20 of 22, added on July 25th, 2013 at 6:47 AM.
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Comment 19 of 22, added on July 25th, 2013 at 6:47 AM.
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Comment 18 of 22, added on July 24th, 2013 at 12:40 PM.
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Comment 17 of 22, added on July 24th, 2013 at 12:40 PM.
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Comment 16 of 22, added on July 23rd, 2013 at 8:14 AM.
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Comment 15 of 22, added on July 23rd, 2013 at 8:14 AM.
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Comment 14 of 22, added on November 23rd, 2011 at 2:55 PM.
icDyhwIuXKCwksd

With the bases loaded you struck us out with that awsner!

Honeysuckle from Hungary
Comment 13 of 22, added on December 12th, 2010 at 11:34 PM.
sleep/lie

I believe that there are actually three variations of this poem. No one so
far has commented on the change of a single world that has profound effect
on interpretation "Sleep the meek members..." Johnson v1859"LIE the meek
memmbers..." Johnson. 216 1861, "SLEEP the meek members" Mabel Loomis Todd,
and "SLEEP the meek members..." Franklin. Todd and Franklin offer only one
version; Johnson, at least includes both. Sleep and Lie connote two very
different things. One (sleep) is definitely biblical. They fell a sleep
in the lord.

Almost all reputable critiques indicate that the poem is anti-resurrection.
This was one of the six or seven poems published in her life time, and in
a conservative newspaper. Those editors, while wishing to give it it a more
Christian slant, may have enhanced the irony of its anti-resurrection theme
by using SLEEP.

I know of no reputable critic who tries to link the poem to the Civil War.
The earlier version predates the Civil War by three years, the later, by a
year.

one of the real problems with Dickinson is that she left so many variation
of her poems. The Bible is an Antique Volume alone leaves sixteen possible
word choices to describe the "teller".

Her Fascicles seemed to be very definitive. Unfortunately, she stopped
constructing them and early editors ignored and/or dismantled them.

regardless, all the versions are magnificent.

Frank C. Papaycik from United States

This poem has been commented on more than 10 times. Click below to see the other comments.
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Information about Safe in their Alabaster Chambers

Poet: Emily Dickinson
Poem: 216. Safe in their Alabaster Chambers
Volume: Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
Year: 1955
Added: Jan 9 2004
Viewed: 9398 times
Poem of the Day: Jan 29 2002


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