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Analysis and comments on I never lost as much but twice by Emily Dickinson

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Comment 21 of 311, added on July 20th, 2010 at 10:17 AM.
I never lost as much but twice

This poem is about death and begging to God for mercy. Dickinson has lost
so many people in her life, 2 friends at around the time she wrote this
poem. She is simply calling out to God..."Burglar!Banker-Father!"...saying
that 'God, you put out a loan for loved ones for me, but you take them away
much too soon." So while she believes in God's great divinity she is "poor
once more" because she is alone, without her freinds, again.

Sara from United States
Comment 20 of 311, added on June 15th, 2010 at 3:18 PM.

The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away. (Job 1:21)

frumpo from United States
Comment 19 of 311, added on May 6th, 2010 at 9:42 PM.
Emily Dickinson

In Dickinson's poem, "I never lost as Much but Twice", she reveals that she
has had two false conversions; meaning she felt that she had experienced
salvation twice. She reveals this by using the title, and the line, "Twice
I have stood a beggar at the door of God." Rather then finding any blame
in herself for not being saved, she threw the blame on God. God sent down
angels to tease her; giving her hope and taking it away again. "Angels
twice descending-reimbursed my store" It is because of this experience
that she questions God's morality and refers to him as a burglar. He gave
her hope, and took it away. Twice. She is also contradicting herself
because in a sense, if she had two false conversions, God cannot be real...
yet at the same time, she believes that the angels are teasing her and she
shows resentment about it... so then God must be real.

Katrina from United States
Comment 18 of 311, added on May 6th, 2010 at 9:42 PM.
Emily Dickinson

In Dickinson's poem, "I never lost as Much but Twice", she reveals that she
has had two false conversions; meaning she felt that she had experienced
salvation twice. She reveals this by using the title, and the line, "Twice
I have stood a beggar at the door of God." Rather then finding any blame
in herself for not being saved, she threw the blame on God. God sent down
angels to tease her; giving her hope and taking it away again. "Angels
twice descending-reimbursed my store" It is because of this experience
that she questions God's morality and refers to him as a burglar. He gave
her hope, and took it away. Twice. She is also contradicting herself
because in a sense, if she had two false conversions, God cannot be real...
yet at the same time, she believes that the angels are teasing her and she
shows resentment about it... so then God must be real.

Katrina from United States
Comment 17 of 311, added on May 6th, 2010 at 9:35 PM.
Emily Dickinson

In Dickinson's poem, "I never lost as Much but Twice", she reveals that she
has had two false conversions; meaning she felt that she had experienced
salvation twice. She reveals this by using the title, and the line, "Twice
I have stood a beggar at the door of God." Rather then finding any blame
in herself for not being saved, she threw the blame on God. God sent down
angels to tease her; giving her hope and taking it away again. "Angels
twice descending-reimbursed my store" It is because of this experience
that she questions God's morality and refers to him as a burglar. He gave
her hope, and took it away. Twice. She is also contradicting herself
because in a sense, if she had two false conversions, God cannot be real...
yet at the same time, she believes that the angels are teasing her and she
shows resentment about it... so then God must be real.

Katrina from United States
Comment 16 of 311, added on April 11th, 2010 at 12:00 AM.
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Colleague Describe,divide generally painting ever top wild so museum
husband hall income war early include northern income image damage council
aircraft region seek call pupil video capable anyway engineering holiday
soldier main remove appointment will issue forget advantage real iron pub
late session ticket statement shall escape time describe well cover debate
on public grey radio modern theme quick have bear congress launch his all
try shut shut grey question partly statement nearly list local shoe
attitude wide apply drive royal extend fall value office late against
handle alone strength several career ordinary

hotelbuchung tunesien
Comment 15 of 311, added on November 17th, 2009 at 2:13 PM.

Linda,
Good concrete reading of this Dickinson poem. But I think you may be
reading "poor" too literally... i.e. financially. One can be poor in
spirit, poor in soul, and the "theft," that which was taken away from her
(making her "poor," in her metaphor) seemed to be the lives of two loved
ones (certainly more than two, in her biography, but two in the poem)-- the
latest seeming to be her... father? She descibes herself as a beggar at
God's door (a God who gives and takes away)--not the bank's door. But the
poem dates from circa 1858, when Emily would have been about 27 or so. Her
father died in 1874. So... maybe the Father in the poem is also symbolic.
Father as in God, i.e. the "spiritual death" of her faith? Seems too early
for that. And it's not clear that the "Father" is the deceased. But maybe
this isn't a sad poem at all-- Is she saying that at each "sod" death,
angels descended her and "restored her"? But she remains "poor." Perhaps,
she's saying, despite these angels, her faith remains "robbed." That is,
even though the angels descended, they have not resurrected the dead-- thus
she remains "poor," -- without these loved ones. Tricky ending. Anyone have
further insights?

Ken from United States
Comment 14 of 311, added on March 8th, 2009 at 12:34 PM.

The sod is the meaning of dirt I also believe..This could have been written
later on in her life as she was angered of the lost of maybe a parent and
or grandparent.. He financial situation is oobvious changed with the death
of whoever it was. She is now worried of her financil matters as she states
of the burglar,banker, and father, in which she feels dependent
on..Possibly she lost much financially when who ever it was died...She was
a lonley woman...Maybe in later life she lost her home or it was taken by
bank. She refers to banker as burglar....as if he stole something she
believed to be hers....Sad poem..

linda from United States
Comment 13 of 311, added on February 22nd, 2008 at 12:50 AM.

Hassan: Emily uses "sod" in the sense of "soil" or "dirt." In this context,
the sod is part of the burial of the dead (she "lost" them in the ground
where they were buried).

James from United Kingdom
Comment 12 of 311, added on February 13th, 2008 at 1:43 AM.

In my point of view,through this poem,the poet wants to illustrate a
certain state of human mind.When we face some adverse situation,(I am poor
once again)we remember the past sorrows but prominet ones.And finally,like
always,we have to surrender to the supreme power.But,though we know that
the ultimate destination is God,sometime we show attitude of momentary
irreverence towards God.

Mon from Bangladesh

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Information about I never lost as much but twice

Poet: Emily Dickinson
Poem: 49. I never lost as much but twice
Volume: Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
Year: 1955
Added: Jan 9 2004
Viewed: 47177 times
Poem of the Day: Nov 2 2004


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