Poets | Bookstore | Poem of the Day | Top 40 | Search | Comments | Privacy
April 17th, 2014 - we have 234 poets, 8,025 poems and 103,948 comments.
Analysis and comments on what if a much of a which of a wind... (XX) by e.e. cummings

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 [9]

Comment 9 of 89, added on September 7th, 2005 at 8:47 PM.

Okay- so this is my take...
ee cummings is totally predicting the future. Its kind of dark and almost
pesimistic the first time through but after you read it like 20 times- you
see where he was going with it.Lines 9-12 relate back to the secret that is
man. The screaming hills arent hills at all- but a human. (Picture human
anatomy for a moment) "strangles valleys by ropes of things" instestines,
veins, ligaments?? line 15- " whose heartts are mountain, roots are trees-
Talking about the strong people who could survuve a much of a which of a
wind. "what if a dawn of a doom of a dream"- thats the beginning of a great
and terrible end. "and sprinkles nowhere you and me"- when its all over we
will be nothing and belong nowhere
I dont really know what to say about the last 2 lines- I dont know what to
make of them..????

Megan
Comment 8 of 89, added on August 28th, 2005 at 12:29 AM.

Hint: The wind symbolizes time.

Bryce
Comment 7 of 89, added on June 16th, 2005 at 2:40 PM.

no matter what you must know that nothing will live forever despite how it
seems, that is the truth behind summers lie, in summer every thing looks
alive and it seems that it will stay that way

nick from United States
Comment 6 of 89, added on May 13th, 2005 at 10:11 AM.

This is a poem that defentaly deals with the experience,fear, and hardships
of living in a World War type of envirnment. One question I am not sure of
is if Cummings tone is positive or negative. The first read through it
seems negative and depressing, however the more you analize the poem it
seems to be positive while mantaning a negative outlook on what Must Come
To Be, "The End Of The World"

jerv from United States
Comment 5 of 89, added on May 10th, 2005 at 10:33 PM.

Each line of this poem can be broken down to have something to do with the
atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945.

Carefully examine it. Take the lines "Blow soon to never; blow never to
twice/ Blow life to isn't; blow death to was" for example: the explosion of
the atomic bomb firstly indefinitely postponed the invasion of Japan,
secondly made mass killing a reality twice, thirdly ended the life of many
Japanese, and fourthly saved the lives of thousands of Americans.

William from United States
Comment 4 of 89, added on May 10th, 2005 at 6:28 AM.

I take it as a commentary on the inherent evil of mankind, maybe its
duality. It seems he is asking what if all this insanity is happening all
around us. All of these polar opposites are unraveling; the single secret
will still be man. Man does and undoes his existence, the most who die the
more we live. We must destroy to survive. It is incredibly ironic that
the sound of the poem is so perfect and rolls off the tongue with such
ease.
just my 2 cynical cents

MIke from United States
Comment 3 of 89, added on May 9th, 2005 at 2:32 PM.

The body of man dies but soul is alive
ths is the secret that the soul is unchangeable.

MOKHTAR from Iran
Comment 2 of 89, added on April 27th, 2005 at 7:13 PM.

I agree with you, Megan! It's totally cool to say aloud! ^_^ EE Cummings
did a really good job on this poem! It's one of my favorites, and, in my
opinion, one of his best! It totally shows humanity as it is and will be...

Hatsumiyo-chan from United States
Comment 1 of 89, added on February 27th, 2005 at 9:51 PM.

To me, this poem is about an apocalypse of pure winter. A great wind of
destruction destroys the stars, covers the earth with snow, makes the sun
appear bloody by blowing dead, fallen autumn leaves all over the place,
causing chaos and destruction. Because of all this, humanity is forced to
be true to its own nature in order to survive - royalty is no better, but
in fact worse than regular people, friends are enemies when the tides have
turned, etc. However, with all the death will emerge survivors who will be
able to stay alive in the midst of all the dying.

That is my humble interpretation of the poem, but seriously? I mainly love
it because it's so cool to say aloud. :-)

Megan from United States

This poem has been commented on more than 10 times. Click below to see the other comments.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 [9]
Share |


Information about what if a much of a which of a wind... (XX)

Poet: e.e. cummings
Poem: what if a much of a which of a wind... (XX)
Added: Feb 20 2003
Viewed: 26680 times
Poem of the Day: Jun 11 2007


Add Comment

Do you have any comments, criticism, paraphrasis or analysis of this poem that you feel would assist other visitors in understanding this poem better? If they are accepted, they will be added to this page of American Poems. Together we can build a wealth of information, but it will take some discipline and determination.

Do not post questions, pleas for homework help or anything of the sort, as these types of comments will be removed. The proper place for questions is the poetry forum.

Please note that after you post a comment, it can take up to an hour before it is visible on the website! Rest assured that your comment is not lost, so don't enter your comment again.

Comment on: what if a much of a which of a wind... (XX)
By: e.e. cummings

Name: (required)
E-mail Address: (required)
Country:
Show E-mail Address:
Yes No
Subject:
Poem Comments:

Poem Info

cummings Info
Copyright © 2000-2012 Gunnar Bengtsson. All Rights Reserved. Links | Bookstore