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Analysis and comments on next to of course god america i... (III) by e.e. cummings

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Comment 36 of 366, added on November 18th, 2010 at 6:38 AM.

YOU Smell cos u all sad as hell

bill clintin
Comment 35 of 366, added on May 25th, 2010 at 3:30 PM.
lastt line

in the last line, when cummings says 'he spoke. And drank rapidly a glass
of water' it could actually be him washing his mouth out from the things he
feels he perhaps should not have said

dani from United Kingdom
Comment 34 of 366, added on April 8th, 2010 at 10:06 AM.

lawl Scott

Jack from United States
Comment 33 of 366, added on December 21st, 2009 at 9:05 PM.

@David and all others who believe the poem is unpatriotic.
This poem by e. e. cummings is actually patriotic. he is admonishing the
people who persuade others to support war.

This analysis gives a good idea as to what e. e. cummings may be trying to
say through the poem:
bookstove.com/Poetry/Patriotism-and-Poetry-next-to-of-course-god-america-i-
by-e-e-cummings.498759

Scott
Comment 32 of 366, added on December 4th, 2009 at 12:40 PM.

TO all those who take this as a symbol of patriotism: you are the people
Cummings is ripping the piss out of with this piece.
The speaker is clearly a politician, the platitudes and unfinished anthem
he spouts are not given meaning, importance, or space.
The form is a usurped form of sonnet (which are always love songs) so what
else can he be doing but usurping this political over-done love for
america?
Notice how slaughter is rhymed with the (unfinished) ending couplet? notice
how it changes rythm on that line?
He is pointing out the senseless slaughter carried out in the name of
america.
Sorry patriots, this is clearly NOT for you. (it is however, brilliant-
like most Cummings work.)

James from United Kingdom
Comment 31 of 366, added on June 2nd, 2009 at 5:53 PM.

As previously alluded to this is NOT intended to be a patriotic poem.
Whatsmore Cummings was a pacifist who dislike the meaningless rhetoric of
patriotism.
To take the content at face value is unwise. This is a satirical poem which
looks to expose and devalue the clichés that are used by supporters of war.
If this were not so this poem would be a string of patriotic platitudes and
therefore of arguably little literary merit. In short this is a parody of
patriotism.

David from United Kingdom
Comment 30 of 366, added on May 1st, 2009 at 7:52 PM.

I luv poems! LoL..
Luv you E.E Cummingz

Fantasia L. from United States
Comment 29 of 366, added on April 11th, 2009 at 3:39 PM.

Cummings is very straightforward in this poem. He doesn’t blind the reader
with emotional interference but still he glorifies the country. Instead, he
blasts the reader with a seemingly meaningless jumble of words. He does so
just to engage the reader, capture his or her attention, and force his or
her brain to begin to think. Cummings leaves out all punctuation except the
question mark at the end. I think he does this just to make the poem
incomprehensible the first time it is read. He makes the last line
comprehensible so that the reader will think that maybe, just maybe, the
poem might make sense. He gives his opinion as straight forward as the
character in his poem can. The reader finds out to who the speaker is in
the last line.
In the first line he is talking about his great his love for America is.
According to the poem, the only love he has greater than America is God.
This is important because it shows that he thinks rationally and honestly
by not saying he has no greater love than America.
In the next part, he is just using politician talk to make it clear who
the speaker is after the reader has read the last line. He makes the
speaker sound important or knowledgeable. One could also argue that he is
making a sarcastic reply to another politicians rant.
Because cummings capitalizes the “H” in he and not the “I” in i, he is
forcing the reader to focus equally on the guy’s character and what he
says. Naturally, we tend to focus more on what the meaning is in writing
than the composition and character of the speaker.
It is very contrasting in of itself. Cumming’s praises the country for
being glorious, but he almost criticizes the soldiers who rush headlong
into war to defend it. He says they think not of honoring their country by
any means but through war and death. I think he is hinting at other, more
peaceful ways to serve America. He doesn’t put down the soldiers because he
calls them “heroic happy dead,” he is just saying they need to think
straighter and more realistically. Cummings is questioning the way we
interpret patriotism and what we consider it to be.
At the end, it says “He spoke. And drank rapidly a glass of water.” This
makes it clearer who the speaker actually is. Because he spoke rapidly and
drank a glass of water, he has got more to say. Who else but politicians
talk rapidly seeming nonsense and always have more to say?


Dimitri from United States
Comment 28 of 366, added on March 16th, 2008 at 2:05 PM.

"America makes prodigious mistakes, America has colossal faults, but one
thing cannot be denied: America is always on the move. She may be going to
Hell, of course, but at least she isn't standing still."

e.e. cummings said the above quote.
I don't mean to be melodramatic (but) this poem couldn't be further away
frompatriotism. The inclusion of 'andsoforth' is indeed (As someone else
mentioned) the poet satirising the superflous spewing of nationalism that
is so typical of (myfellow) americans. That is really only one example, but
i cant be bothered to think of more, so forget about it.

J.A. Garrido from United States
Comment 27 of 366, added on March 9th, 2008 at 1:32 AM.

The poem is satirizing the fact that America is great. But in reality is
very different. one of the ideals of America is lierty or equality, but
they dont have it. He also criticizes the polititions for inaction,
theytend to say things, but never do it. They are repeating the same things
again and again and it becomes meaning les.

kichu from India

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Information about next to of course god america i... (III)

Poet: e.e. cummings
Poem: next to of course god america i... (III)
Added: Feb 20 2003
Viewed: 2351 times
Poem of the Day: Jan 28 2007


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