Poets | Poem of the Day | Top 40 | Search | Comments | Privacy
May 30th, 2015 - we have 234 poets, 8,025 poems and 288,562 comments.
Analysis and comments on somewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond by e.e. cummings

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 [19] 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26

Comment 78 of 258, added on November 19th, 2005 at 3:39 PM.

quite simply, the best poem ever written.

dwain from United States
Comment 77 of 258, added on November 13th, 2005 at 5:18 PM.

This stuff really helped me as I'm writing a comparative analysis between
"The Glass Menagerie" and this poem, with special emphasis on the
epigraph.

Anyone have anything that wasn't already said to point out to me? Any help
would be appreciated.

Mark from United States
Comment 76 of 258, added on November 7th, 2005 at 12:00 PM.

The last lines of this poem: "nobody, not even the rain has such small
hands" played a crucial role in igniting a passionate relationship with a
woman to whom I later became engaged . These were lines I remembered when
I wanted to send her a short meaningful telegraph at one time. She, being
a poet herself, was quite impressed. She thought that I had written
them!...This poem's strength lies in its successive vivid contrasts, each
of which is founded on equally vivid concrete natural images... "...which I
cannot touch because it is too near" evokes the truth of how the immediacy
of overwhelming presence is ironically something which, out of our
incapacity and unprepared ness in coping for such personal intensity,
actually creates a type of awe-filled DISTANCE through the awareness of our
inability to adequately respond to its call...The images of "unclosing,
"opening "and "closing beautifully" evokes the very real experience of how
sensitive love, like a flower responding to light, can move us through
every stage of receptivity and closure in a way that m creates every one
of these states, in us, as a thing of beauty..."The voice of all roses" is
that subtle aroma of love which in its very, barely noticed transforming
potency, is in fact a "voice."...The last lines are stunning in their
evocative power. The far-because so awesomely near, potent because
fragile, vocal because silent, amorous power of love, is engendered by that
ultimate contrast which is evoked by the final line: "hands" are the
organs of power and yet they are most powerful when they are sensitive
enough--"small enough"--to permeate into our very selves. Like the "hands
of rain"--small as drops, which become ever smaller as they seep right into
our skin.


Yakov
Comment 75 of 258, added on November 7th, 2005 at 4:35 AM.

The last lines of this poem: "nobody, not even the rain has such small
hands" played a crucial role in igniting a passsionate relationship with a
woman to whom I later became engaged . These were lines I remembered when
I wanted to send her a short meaningful telegraph at one time. She, being
a poet herself, wes quite impressed. She thought that I had written
them!...This poem's strength lies in its successive vivid contrasts, each
of which is founded on equally vivid concrete natural images... "...which I
cannot touch because it is too near" evokes the truth of how the immediacy
of overwhelming presence is ironically somethng which, out of our
incapicity and unpreparedness in coping for such personal intensity,
actually creates a type of awe-filled DISTANCE through the awareness of our
inability to adeqauately respond to its call...The images of "unclosing,
"opening "and "closing beautifully" evokes the very real experience of how
sensitive love, like a flower responding to light, can move us through
every stage of receptivity and closure in a way that m creates every one
of these states, in us, as a thing of beauty..."The voice of all roses" is
that subtle aroma of love which in its very, barely noticed transforming
potency, is in fact a "voice."...The last lines are stunning in their
evocative power. The far-because so awsomely near, potent because fragile,
vocal because silent, emorous power of love, is engendered by that ultimate
contrast which is evoked by the final line: "hands" are the organs of
power and yet they are most powerful when they are sensitive enough--"small
enough"--to permeate into our very selves. Like the "hands of rain"--small
as drops, which become ever smaller as they seep right into our skin.

yakov newman
Comment 74 of 258, added on October 23rd, 2005 at 12:56 PM.

The poem is not about love. It is about adoration, a man humbling himself
to the woman's "intense fragility," allowing the woman to "close and
unclose him" as she wishes.

noe from United States
Comment 73 of 258, added on October 17th, 2005 at 9:19 AM.

my favorite poem ever!

Shawn from United States
Comment 72 of 258, added on October 11th, 2005 at 3:52 PM.

Interesting you ended up as comment 69. Yes yes poetry is so subjective
and cummings is a sexist. He should have said that the lover openend him as
spring opens and closes its first penis. What would you expect him to say.
But your right let's take all reference to roses and rose petals out of
poems. At any event kudos to the commentary. As much as I love this poem,
I enjoy reading opinions of it (like 69's) even more).

panama2 from Argentina
Comment 71 of 258, added on October 9th, 2005 at 2:14 PM.

I first heard this poem as read by Ron Perlman reading it as he portrayed
the role of 'Vincent' in the 80s TV show 'Beauty and the Beast'. It has
stuck in my mind since but it was only recently that I found out who wrote
it.

Thanks to the internet I have been introduced to other great works by
Cummings. However this will always be my favourite.

Jocelyn from United Arab Emirates
Comment 70 of 258, added on October 9th, 2005 at 9:24 AM.

Zeca Baleiro form Brazil is one of the bests poets in the world, and he is
a fan of cummings. He saw Hannah and her sisters of woody allen and have
been fascinated with this poem, and then made a music with the poem...the
name is Nalgum Lugar....check it out...thanks

Flávio Martins from Brazil
Comment 69 of 258, added on October 9th, 2005 at 6:33 AM.

the poem is rich with imagery. but dont you think e.e. cummings is a bit
sexist? the images project a different picture epecially the 3rd line, 2nd
stanza: you open always petal by petal myself as Spring opens (touching
skillfully, mysteriously) her first rose.

throughout the poem, it gives us different connotations on love and sex.
well, that's just my comment.. poetry is subjective ;)

serene santiago from Philippines

This poem has been commented on more than 10 times. Click below to see the other comments.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 [19] 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26
Share |


Information about somewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond

Poet: e.e. cummings
Poem: somewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond
Added: Jan 31 2004
Viewed: 3437 times
Poem of the Day: Dec 7 2000


Add Comment

Do you have any comments, criticism, paraphrasis or analysis of this poem that you feel would assist other visitors in understanding this poem better? If they are accepted, they will be added to this page of American Poems. Together we can build a wealth of information, but it will take some discipline and determination.

Do not post questions, pleas for homework help or anything of the sort, as these types of comments will be removed. The proper place for questions is the poetry forum.

Please note that after you post a comment, it can take up to an hour before it is visible on the website! Rest assured that your comment is not lost, so don't enter your comment again.

Comment on: somewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond
By: e.e. cummings

Name: (required)
E-mail Address: (required)
Country:
Show E-mail Address:
Yes No
Subject:
Poem Comments:

Poem Info

cummings Info
Copyright © 2000-2015 Gunnar Bengtsson. All Rights Reserved. Links