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Analysis and comments on somewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond by e.e. cummings

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Comment 83 of 253, added on January 10th, 2006 at 4:22 AM.

totally awesome!
One of my Favorites..

marlonus999 from Philippines
Comment 82 of 253, added on January 4th, 2006 at 2:18 AM.

this is my favorite poem of all time, and i do believe it to be the best
love poem ever written; never mind poetic construction deviation-- love
simply overrides any convention anyway. listen to the poem being recited
while your eyes are closed... you'll know what i mean.

guerdon from Philippines
Comment 81 of 253, added on December 4th, 2005 at 5:54 PM.

Really? A love poem? Well, I guess. But I always thought that it was about
witnessing the death of someone you love.

Deborah A. from United States
Comment 80 of 253, added on November 28th, 2005 at 10:10 PM.

this is one of my favorite poems.cummings certainly know how to play with
words.a syntactical analysis perhaps would help one understand the meaning
of this poem.but to me,this poem is as mysterious as the rain's small
hands.

charisse from Philippines
Comment 79 of 253, added on November 23rd, 2005 at 4:58 PM.

I thought it might interest some to know that the replication of this poem
is just a little off in it's printing. As with much of his work, Cummings
chose to override prescriptive grammar, and things like punctuation and
capitalization might appear incorrect. For example the first line reads:
"somewhere i have never travelled,gladly beyond" I think the deviation from
his original work is ignoring a central component to his art form and
creates something entirely different, like painting Mona Lisa frowning.

Grace from United Kingdom
Comment 78 of 253, added on November 19th, 2005 at 3:39 PM.

quite simply, the best poem ever written.

dwain from United States
Comment 77 of 253, added on November 13th, 2005 at 5:18 PM.

This stuff really helped me as I'm writing a comparative analysis between
"The Glass Menagerie" and this poem, with special emphasis on the
epigraph.

Anyone have anything that wasn't already said to point out to me? Any help
would be appreciated.

Mark from United States
Comment 76 of 253, added on November 7th, 2005 at 12:00 PM.

The last lines of this poem: "nobody, not even the rain has such small
hands" played a crucial role in igniting a passionate relationship with a
woman to whom I later became engaged . These were lines I remembered when
I wanted to send her a short meaningful telegraph at one time. She, being
a poet herself, was quite impressed. She thought that I had written
them!...This poem's strength lies in its successive vivid contrasts, each
of which is founded on equally vivid concrete natural images... "...which I
cannot touch because it is too near" evokes the truth of how the immediacy
of overwhelming presence is ironically something which, out of our
incapacity and unprepared ness in coping for such personal intensity,
actually creates a type of awe-filled DISTANCE through the awareness of our
inability to adequately respond to its call...The images of "unclosing,
"opening "and "closing beautifully" evokes the very real experience of how
sensitive love, like a flower responding to light, can move us through
every stage of receptivity and closure in a way that m creates every one
of these states, in us, as a thing of beauty..."The voice of all roses" is
that subtle aroma of love which in its very, barely noticed transforming
potency, is in fact a "voice."...The last lines are stunning in their
evocative power. The far-because so awesomely near, potent because
fragile, vocal because silent, amorous power of love, is engendered by that
ultimate contrast which is evoked by the final line: "hands" are the
organs of power and yet they are most powerful when they are sensitive
enough--"small enough"--to permeate into our very selves. Like the "hands
of rain"--small as drops, which become ever smaller as they seep right into
our skin.


Yakov
Comment 75 of 253, added on November 7th, 2005 at 4:35 AM.

The last lines of this poem: "nobody, not even the rain has such small
hands" played a crucial role in igniting a passsionate relationship with a
woman to whom I later became engaged . These were lines I remembered when
I wanted to send her a short meaningful telegraph at one time. She, being
a poet herself, wes quite impressed. She thought that I had written
them!...This poem's strength lies in its successive vivid contrasts, each
of which is founded on equally vivid concrete natural images... "...which I
cannot touch because it is too near" evokes the truth of how the immediacy
of overwhelming presence is ironically somethng which, out of our
incapicity and unpreparedness in coping for such personal intensity,
actually creates a type of awe-filled DISTANCE through the awareness of our
inability to adeqauately respond to its call...The images of "unclosing,
"opening "and "closing beautifully" evokes the very real experience of how
sensitive love, like a flower responding to light, can move us through
every stage of receptivity and closure in a way that m creates every one
of these states, in us, as a thing of beauty..."The voice of all roses" is
that subtle aroma of love which in its very, barely noticed transforming
potency, is in fact a "voice."...The last lines are stunning in their
evocative power. The far-because so awsomely near, potent because fragile,
vocal because silent, emorous power of love, is engendered by that ultimate
contrast which is evoked by the final line: "hands" are the organs of
power and yet they are most powerful when they are sensitive enough--"small
enough"--to permeate into our very selves. Like the "hands of rain"--small
as drops, which become ever smaller as they seep right into our skin.

yakov newman
Comment 74 of 253, added on October 23rd, 2005 at 12:56 PM.

The poem is not about love. It is about adoration, a man humbling himself
to the woman's "intense fragility," allowing the woman to "close and
unclose him" as she wishes.

noe from United States

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Information about somewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond

Poet: e.e. cummings
Poem: somewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond
Added: Jan 31 2004
Viewed: 2199 times
Poem of the Day: Dec 7 2000


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