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Analysis and comments on in Just- by e.e. cummings

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Comment 70 of 770, added on April 6th, 2006 at 5:56 PM.

The title of this poem is Chansons Innocentes part I. The entire poem is in
three parts. It comes from the collection titled Tulips and Chimneys
published in 1923. It has become customary to list even poems with titles
by their first lines because so few of cummings's poems have titles. Anyone
could look this up. It's not up for discussion what the "title" in Just
means! This posting does harm to the poem with incorrect line breaks and
spelling errors. To Benny from Canada: note the balloonman starts out lame
and ends up goat-footed (meaning sure-footed)! cummings always celebrates
innocence.

Melanie from United States
Comment 69 of 770, added on April 5th, 2006 at 1:29 PM.

This poem is simply AMAZING.

liz from United States
Comment 68 of 770, added on March 14th, 2006 at 3:23 PM.

i love this poem i actually recited it for a class prject
and got a A. my teacher is also a fan.

patrick from United States
Comment 67 of 770, added on March 9th, 2006 at 9:32 PM.

Something I forgot to mention - the title. "In Just-" is most likely
abbreviated. The full title would be "In Justice", or "Injustice". This
brings up another paradox. If you say it like, "In Justice", it means that
children inevitably losing their innocence is a just occurence and that it
happens to the best of us. However, if you read it as, "Injustice", it's a
commentary on the bitterness that it's not fair that little children have
to be so easily led astray into adulthood (i.e.: perversion) thus losing
their innocence forever.

Benny from Canada
Comment 66 of 770, added on March 9th, 2006 at 9:25 PM.

In our class we simplified the entire poem. The "goatfooted balloonMan" is
an allusion to Pan from Greek mythology. He was promiscuous and overtly
sexual, constantly trying to seduce the Nymphs. The little children
symbolize innocence, and Pan (balloonman) symbolizes perversion. The
balloonman (something fun that children would enjoy) is calling to them.
"Wee" could be the sound of him whistling or it could add to the irony that
the children are happy (i.e.: "Whee! Balloonman!") to follow him but
don't even realize that they're leaving childhood behind and becoming more
acquainted with uglier things (i.e.: perversion) in life.

Paraphrase: Loss of innocence.

Benny from Canada
Comment 65 of 770, added on March 2nd, 2006 at 10:59 PM.

the ballonman with goat feet refers to a faun or satyr

satyr from United States
Comment 64 of 770, added on March 1st, 2006 at 7:50 PM.

balloon is spelled b a l l o o n, not b a l o o n. there are two l's. i
looked this up and saw this poem elsewhere, and it is not cummings's
mistake, it is yours.

balloonman from United States
Comment 63 of 770, added on February 22nd, 2006 at 3:54 PM.

all u robert frost lovin mo fo's don't know poetry. Frost is the Paris
Hilton or the andrew lloyd weber of writing. too much hype, not enough
talent.

winnie
Comment 62 of 770, added on February 22nd, 2006 at 3:45 PM.

I agree. In "if i believe", a work from his highly-proclaimed "The Enormous
Room",his title is derived from the first line in his poem. As well, let it
be known that e e cummings is the shit. He's the Jackson Pollack and Jimi
Hendrix of the literary world!!! e e is my fav!

Winnie from Vietnam
Comment 61 of 770, added on February 17th, 2006 at 12:22 PM.

this is cool


chris from United States

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Information about in Just-

Poet: e.e. cummings
Poem: in Just-
Added: Jan 31 2004
Viewed: 4897 times
Poem of the Day: Aug 31 2000


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