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Edna St. Vincent Millay - The Fawn

There it was I saw what I shall never forget
And never retrieve.
Monstrous and beautiful to human eyes, hard to
	believe,
He lay, yet there he lay,
Asleep on the moss, his head on his polished cleft
	small ebony hoves,
The child of the doe, the dappled child of the deer.

Surely his mother had never said, "Lie here
Till I return," so spotty and plain to see
On the green moss lay he.
His eyes had opened; he considered me.

I would have given more than I care to say
To thrifty ears, might I have had him for my friend
One moment only of that forest day:


Might I have had the acceptance, not the love
Of those clear eyes;
Might I have been for him in the bough above
Or the root beneath his forest bed,
A part of the forest, seen without surprise.

Was it alarm, or was it the wind of my fear lest he
	depart
That jerked him to his jointy knees,
And sent him crashing off, leaping and stumbling
On his new legs, between the stems of the white
	trees?

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Added: Feb 21 2003 | Viewed: 7383 times | Comments and analysis of The Fawn by Edna St. Vincent Millay Comments (1)

The Fawn - Comments and Information

Poet: Edna St. Vincent Millay
Poem: The Fawn

Comment 1 of 1, added on January 23rd, 2006 at 5:47 PM.

the discription of the faun

george from China

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