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Analysis and comments on Happiness by Carl Sandburg

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Comment 17 of 87, added on December 21st, 2010 at 10:32 AM.

Sandburg is simply saying: Happeness is relative. The Hungarians were just
one example.

Randy from United States
Comment 16 of 87, added on September 15th, 2010 at 11:01 AM.
Happiness

I think what Sandburg is really trying to say is that one cannot truly be
happy unless one takes accordion lessons.


Steve from United States
Comment 15 of 87, added on July 6th, 2009 at 12:12 AM.

I believe that this poem should be read through a lens of an American
experiencing a brand new ethnicity like Hungarians into the stew known as
America. I know the pride I see in my Grandparents faces that have
immigrated to this nation when they BBQ with their families and revel in
the accomplishments of everyone. Hungarians being new immigrants to this
country when this poem was written were still achieving their goals and
happy for every minute of that struggle, through their acculturation and
assimilation into American society. Look at any new immigrant to America
and tell me there isn't a thankfulness and happiness about them.

Robb from United States
Comment 14 of 87, added on August 10th, 2008 at 8:37 PM.

happiness must not be asked to anyone cause it is a personal experience. in
the poem, carl sandburg is trying to find answers of what happiness is, but
in the end, he himself answered his own question.=)

ofelia austria from Dominica
Comment 13 of 87, added on July 31st, 2008 at 8:57 PM.

Yeah! Happiness must be experienced..

Elvie from Philippines
Comment 12 of 87, added on July 18th, 2008 at 7:09 AM.

it is love, here, in this poem that keeps happiness on. cause' love is
nothing more to ask and nothing more to give.

jessexiang
Comment 11 of 87, added on August 1st, 2007 at 2:02 AM.

I read the poem Happiness and I recite it in the class. The poem expresses
that Hapiness is gained through contentment.

Lyannefe from Philippines
Comment 10 of 87, added on January 18th, 2007 at 3:38 PM.

I say that this poem says that hppines is not somthing you could some up in
a pome or letter its just thare

sam from United States
Comment 9 of 87, added on June 18th, 2006 at 1:31 PM.

I don't work at "showing my ignorance." Like everyone else here, I
expressed an opinion, and if you think I am ignorant, please explain why
you think so. We are all ignorant on something or other, and are not in
that condition deliberately. If you are so smart (i.e., non-ignorant),
show me why I should believe you.

Bettie Malofie from Canada
Comment 8 of 87, added on April 9th, 2006 at 9:16 PM.

Oh, dear Bettie. Try not to show your ignorance.

Reesa from United States

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Information about Happiness

Poet: Carl Sandburg
Poem: 17. Happiness
Volume: Chicago Poems
- Chicago Poems
Year: 1912
Added: Feb 4 2004
Viewed: 541 times
Poem of the Day: Jan 26 2003


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