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Analysis and comments on Wanting to Die by Anne Sexton

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Comment 6 of 76, added on May 19th, 2008 at 12:32 AM.

"Wanting to die" is one of Sexton's third collection of poems "Live or
Die". Live or Die is considered the finest collection, because sexton
received the Pulitzer Prize in poetry. It is the record of four years of
emotional illness, the turns of fears and despair, and suicidal depression.
The major theme of this poem, in particularly, and this collection, in
generally, is the choice that Sexton must make between life and death.
Consequently Sexton insists to die because of her painful life and bad
state. She suffers from many breakdowns as her divorce, the death of her
both parents and her aunt, and also the departure of her daughters.


General idea

"Wanting to die" is, quite simply, about wanting to die; it presents
the suicide's case in language as austere as Sylvia Plath's, and is
remarkable for its dispassionate examination of the helpless "betrayal" of
the body.

(Oates 313)
The whole poem gives reasons and explanation for her wish to die.
"The almost unnameable lust" corresponds with Freud's theory of the
death-drive: a deep urge inside the human ego that pushes the individual
towards death.

(Lazaroms 23)
Sexton believes that death will take her to a better place .She also thinks
that death is sweeter than life. The reader can feel that Sexton expresses
her broken heart as she says "Then the almost unnameable lust returns.",
and "and the love, whatever it was, an infection." Thus
Sexton's life has no purpose, and it deals with depression. Consequently
she wants to entertain by committing suicide.

Analysis

*The first stanza
Since you ask, most days I cannot remember.
I walk in my clothing, unmarked by that voyage.
Then the almost unnameable lust returns

The poem "Wanting to die" begins with an answer of a question of unknown
questioner why do you want to die? Sexton answers this question "since you
ask" that means she is in a voyage. This voyage is committing suicide, and
she calls it "unnameable lust". She also mentions "returns" which means
that this attempt is not the first time to commit suicide. The reader can
feel suicide is an instinct, because Sexton describes it "lust" which she
longs for.

*The second stanza
Even then I have nothing against
life.
I know well the grass blades you mention,
the furniture you have placed under the sun.

In this stanza, Sexton welcomes death when it comes, because she does not
want life "Even then I have nothing against life". Death contradicts with
life. In the second line "I know well the grass blades you mention" Sexton
returns to address the unknown questioner, but this
time she reveals his character. The unknown questioner is God who creates
the grass and the sun to support life. God confronts her wish to die by
creating them, but she also insists to die.

*The third stanza
But suicides have a special language.
Like carpenters they want to know which tools.
They never ask why build.

This entire stanza expresses and presents Sexton's reasons for her wish.
Therefore she defends from death, suicide, as she says "suicides have
special language". She also compares it to skillful carpenter who improves
his work by using the best methods "tools". Thus the person, who wants to
commit suicide, has everything planned out.

*The fourth stanza
Twice I have so simply declared myself,
have possessed the enemy, eaten the enemy,
have taken on his craft, his magic.

Sexton continues answering the same question "Twice I have so simply
declared myself". At this time Sexton specifies the number of times that
"unnameable lust "has returned. She also mentions suicides as being "so
simply" that means suicides are not difficult to commit. However, there is
a difficult and hostile relationship to suicide "possessed the enemy, eaten
the enemy", she can overcome it as she says "have taken on his craft, his
magic". Sexton transforms this voyage "suicide" into something higher by
saying "his magic" to increase its importance.

*The fifth stanza
In this way, heavy and thoughtful,
warmer than oil or water,
I have rested, drooling at the mouth-hole.

Sexton is still talking about her voyage. She describes it "heavy and
thoughtful"; however she has described it before "so simply". Consequently
the reader can understand this voyage as it is neither thoughtless impulse
nor effortless surrender. Although it is comforting "warmer than oil or
water" and peaceful "I have rested". When she says "drooling at the
mouth-hole", the readers can feel that Sexton is under the effect of
addiction.

*The sixth stanza
I did not think of my body at needle point.
Even the cornea and the leftover urine were gone.
Suicides have already betrayed the body.

This stanza gives the evidence of Sexton's addiction "my body at needle
point". Sexton has a special relationship with her body, because she does
not think in it even it is in pain. Consequently suicides have bad
characteristics "suicides have already betrayed the body". They allow her
ignore her body.


*The seventh stanza
Still-born, they don't always die,
but dazzled, they can't forget a drug so sweet
that even children would look on and smile.

Here Sexton talks about suicides which do not die. She believes that death
is a better place where she will not die, but she will be impressed. In
this stanza, there is another evidence of her addiction "so sweet that even
children would look on and smile". Sexton makes children, who are the
symbols of innocence, smile at the sight of it as the suicide is one of
their motives.

*The eighth stanza
To thrust all that life under your
tongue!--
that, all by itself, becomes a passion.
Death's a sad Bone; bruised, you'd say,

The first line is an interesting line that gives a feeling, which someone
desires to live, that she feels but toward death. She considers ending life
as a passion, because life is not simple. Then Sexton refers to death
"Death's sad Bone" which reveals the concept of death was in her bones,
structure, and was build in her body's system. Suicide is in Sexton's mind
and body.
*The ninth stanza
and yet she waits for me, year after year,
to so delicately undo an old wound,
to empty my breath from its bad prison

In this stanza, Sexton compares death to a female person "she waits".
Unfortunately, death did not take her this time. It is patient, but it has
determined to take her one day "year after year". By saying "undo an old
wound" Sexton refers to an old pain that she wants death to remove. From
here, death begins to change its negative role "sad Bone" to be more
positive "undo an old wound". Not only does death remove old pain, but also
it will free the present, her body "bad prison.

*The tenth stanza
Balanced there, suicides sometimes meet,
raging at the fruit, a pumped-up moon,
leaving the bread they mistook for a kiss,

Sexton believes that suicides' spirits meet together. She has strong
emotions because of suicide's concept which will give her the expected
happiness. In this stanza, Sexton shows the reader the betrayal that she
feels "leaving the bread they mistook for a kiss".

*The eleventh stanza
leaving the page of the book carelessly open,
something unsaid, the phone off the hook
and the love, whatever it was, an infection.

Finally, suicides are also ready to depart "leaving the page of the book
carelessly open". It seems that they want to say something "something
unsaid", and "the phone off the hook". No one knows why suicides leave
without finishing its business. The reader can extract the reason of their
leaving as Sexton says "and the love, whatever it was, an infection".
Therefore they leave because of love (someone, life ...) and they are also
disappointed. The last line "whatever it was, an infection" creates a sense
of deep disillusionment and pain that life has been drawn Sexton off from
them. However suicides gave up, they have more to offer than life.

Poetic technique
Language

Sexton uses wonderful expressions and words to prove her idea about
suicide. In the first stanza she employs the word "lust" to show the reader
how it is important and instinctive. She also uses words like "grass, sun"
to prove that her wish is stronger than the effect of them. Then she
justifies her idea by saying "suicides have a special language". In this
poem, Sexton gives suicide other characteristics "like carpenter, his
craft, his magic, thoughtful, warmer" which reveal how suicide is skillful
in its work Sexton succeeds to introduce suicide in good appearance to push
the reader to commit suicide.
Some of Sexton's expressions clarify that she is drunken as in "a drug so
sweet", "my body at needle point", and "drooling at mouth-hole". Sexton is
one of the feminist poets, so she compares death to a female "she waits".
She also uses two expressions to confirm that suicide in her mind "lust"
and in her body's system "sad Bone". In this poem, Sexton gives death a big
effective role "undo an old wound", and "to empty my breath from its bad
prison". Consequently Sexton succeeds to prove her idea through her
significant words and indicative expressions.

Imagery
Sexton's images also help her language to present death as she sees. She
does not use a lot of kinds of figures of speech, but her images are
expressive as she uses

Metaphors in "I walk in my clothing", "eaten the enemy", and "empty my
breath".

(2, 11, 27)
In the first metaphor, she compares her clothes to a tunnel. In the
second one, she resembles the enemy as a food that she has eaten. In the
third one, she depicts her breath as a bottle that death will pour. Sexton
also uses a lot of
Personifications in
But suicides have a special language.
have possessed the enemy, eaten the enemy,
have taken on his craft, his magic.
Suicides have already betrayed the body.
Death's a sad Bone; bruised, you'd say,
and yet she waits for me, year after year,
to empty my breath from its bad prison.
Balanced there, suicides sometimes meet
(7, 11,
12, 18, 24, 25, 27, 31)

Sexton uses all these personifications to compare death to a human
being. She also uses
Simile in "But suicide have a special language like carpenters"

(7)
Sexton uses repetition to confirm the meaning.
Repetition in "have possessed the enemy, eaten the enemy", "year after
year".

(11, 25)
Musicality
Anne Sexton employs some alliterations, assonances, and sound pattern to
add music to the poem, for example
Alliteration in
Twice I have so simply declared myself,
but dazzled, they can't forget a drug so sweet
Death's a sad Bone; bruised, you'd say,
Balanced there, suicides sometimes meet

(10, 20, 24, 28)
Assonance in "warmer than oil or water".

(14)
Sound pattern in "have possessed the enemy, eaten the enemy".

(7)

Tone
Although the poem talks about Sexton's wish to die, the tone is optimistic.
In this poem, Sexton defends from death against life. Therefore she uses
optimistic words which make the poem very hopeful. This appears when she
praises suicides "have special languages", and "his magic". However, in the
last two stanzas the tone begins to transforms into hopeless tone because
suicide leaves Sexton without finishing his work "leaving the bread they
mistook for a kiss", and "leaving the page of the book carelessly open".



Form

"Wanting to die" is a short poem in free verse that divides its thirty
three lines into eleven tercets (three line stanza). The whole poem is an
answer of a question.


Conclusion

In "Wanting to die" Sexton notes that her body, her essential physical, is
only in a "bad prison" that should be emptied of breath to feel free.
Sexton ties to find her freedom through poetry. She wants to remove this
crucial and unnecessary prison by the help of death. Therefore her emphasis
in her third collection "Live or Die" is not upon confession with its
implication of guilt, but upon compassion for herself and for all those who
have influenced her personal existence. In this poem, Sexton failed again
to commit suicide, but this time was not the last attempt, because Sexton
really died by committing suicide by carbon monoxide poisoning in 1974.



yaso from Egypt
Comment 5 of 76, added on May 18th, 2008 at 5:27 PM.

"Wanting to die" is one of Sexton's third collection of poems "Live or
Die". Live or Die is considered the finest collection, because sexton
received the Pulitzer Prize in poetry. It is the record of four years of
emotional illness, the turns of fears and despair, and suicidal depression.
The major theme of this poem, in particularly, and this collection, in
generally, is the choice that Sexton must make between life and death.
Consequently Sexton insists to die because of her painful life and bad
state. She suffers from many breakdowns as her divorce, the death of her
both parents and her aunt, and also the departure of her daughters.


General idea

"Wanting to die" is, quite simply, about wanting to die; it presents
the suicide's case in language as austere as Sylvia Plath's, and is
remarkable for its dispassionate examination of the helpless "betrayal" of
the body.

(Oates 313)
The whole poem gives reasons and explanation for her wish to die.
"The almost unnameable lust" corresponds with Freud's theory of the
death-drive: a deep urge inside the human ego that pushes the individual
towards death.

(Lazaroms 23)
Sexton believes that death will take her to a better place .She also thinks
that death is sweeter than life. The reader can feel that Sexton expresses
her broken heart as she says "Then the almost unnameable lust returns.",
and "and the love, whatever it was, an infection." Thus
Sexton's life has no purpose, and it deals with depression. Consequently
she wants to entertain by committing suicide.

Analysis

*The first stanza
Since you ask, most days I cannot remember.
I walk in my clothing, unmarked by that voyage.
Then the almost unnameable lust returns

The poem "Wanting to die" begins with an answer of a question of unknown
questioner why do you want to die? Sexton answers this question "since you
ask" that means she is in a voyage. This voyage is committing suicide, and
she calls it "unnameable lust". She also mentions "returns" which means
that this attempt is not the first time to commit suicide. The reader can
feel suicide is an instinct, because Sexton describes it "lust" which she
longs for.

*The second stanza
Even then I have nothing against
life.
I know well the grass blades you mention,
the furniture you have placed under the sun.

In this stanza, Sexton welcomes death when it comes, because she does not
want life "Even then I have nothing against life". Death contradicts with
life. In the second line "I know well the grass blades you mention" Sexton
returns to address the unknown questioner, but this
time she reveals his character. The unknown questioner is God who creates
the grass and the sun to support life. God confronts her wish to die by
creating them, but she also insists to die.

*The third stanza
But suicides have a special language.
Like carpenters they want to know which tools.
They never ask why build.

This entire stanza expresses and presents Sexton's reasons for her wish.
Therefore she defends from death, suicide, as she says "suicides have
special language". She also compares it to skillful carpenter who improves
his work by using the best methods "tools". Thus the person, who wants to
commit suicide, has everything planned out.

*The fourth stanza
Twice I have so simply declared myself,
have possessed the enemy, eaten the enemy,
have taken on his craft, his magic.

Sexton continues answering the same question "Twice I have so simply
declared myself". At this time Sexton specifies the number of times that
"unnameable lust "has returned. She also mentions suicides as being "so
simply" that means suicides are not difficult to commit. However, there is
a difficult and hostile relationship to suicide "possessed the enemy, eaten
the enemy", she can overcome it as she says "have taken on his craft, his
magic". Sexton transforms this voyage "suicide" into something higher by
saying "his magic" to increase its importance.

*The fifth stanza
In this way, heavy and thoughtful,
warmer than oil or water,
I have rested, drooling at the mouth-hole.

Sexton is still talking about her voyage. She describes it "heavy and
thoughtful"; however she has described it before "so simply". Consequently
the reader can understand this voyage as it is neither thoughtless impulse
nor effortless surrender. Although it is comforting "warmer than oil or
water" and peaceful "I have rested". When she says "drooling at the
mouth-hole", the readers can feel that Sexton is under the effect of
addiction.

*The sixth stanza
I did not think of my body at needle point.
Even the cornea and the leftover urine were gone.
Suicides have already betrayed the body.

This stanza gives the evidence of Sexton's addiction "my body at needle
point". Sexton has a special relationship with her body, because she does
not think in it even it is in pain. Consequently suicides have bad
characteristics "suicides have already betrayed the body". They allow her
ignore her body.


*The seventh stanza
Still-born, they don't always die,
but dazzled, they can't forget a drug so sweet
that even children would look on and smile.

Here Sexton talks about suicides which do not die. She believes that death
is a better place where she will not die, but she will be impressed. In
this stanza, there is another evidence of her addiction "so sweet that even
children would look on and smile". Sexton makes children, who are the
symbols of innocence, smile at the sight of it as the suicide is one of
their motives.

*The eighth stanza
To thrust all that life under your
tongue!--
that, all by itself, becomes a passion.
Death's a sad Bone; bruised, you'd say,

The first line is an interesting line that gives a feeling, which someone
desires to live, that she feels but toward death. She considers ending life
as a passion, because life is not simple. Then Sexton refers to death
"Death's sad Bone" which reveals the concept of death was in her bones,
structure, and was build in her body's system. Suicide is in Sexton's mind
and body.
*The ninth stanza
and yet she waits for me, year after year,
to so delicately undo an old wound,
to empty my breath from its bad prison

In this stanza, Sexton compares death to a female person "she waits".
Unfortunately, death did not take her this time. It is patient, but it has
determined to take her one day "year after year". By saying "undo an old
wound" Sexton refers to an old pain that she wants death to remove. From
here, death begins to change its negative role "sad Bone" to be more
positive "undo an old wound". Not only does death remove old pain, but also
it will free the present, her body "bad prison.

*The tenth stanza
Balanced there, suicides sometimes meet,
raging at the fruit, a pumped-up moon,
leaving the bread they mistook for a kiss,

Sexton believes that suicides' spirits meet together. She has strong
emotions because of suicide's concept which will give her the expected
happiness. In this stanza, Sexton shows the reader the betrayal that she
feels "leaving the bread they mistook for a kiss".

*The eleventh stanza
leaving the page of the book carelessly open,
something unsaid, the phone off the hook
and the love, whatever it was, an infection.

Finally, suicides are also ready to depart "leaving the page of the book
carelessly open". It seems that they want to say something "something
unsaid", and "the phone off the hook". No one knows why suicides leave
without finishing its business. The reader can extract the reason of their
leaving as Sexton says "and the love, whatever it was, an infection".
Therefore they leave because of love (someone, life ...) and they are also
disappointed. The last line "whatever it was, an infection" creates a sense
of deep disillusionment and pain that life has been drawn Sexton off from
them. However suicides gave up, they have more to offer than life.

Poetic technique
Language

Sexton uses wonderful expressions and words to prove her idea about
suicide. In the first stanza she employs the word "lust" to show the reader
how it is important and instinctive. She also uses words like "grass, sun"
to prove that her wish is stronger than the effect of them. Then she
justifies her idea by saying "suicides have a special language". In this
poem, Sexton gives suicide other characteristics "like carpenter, his
craft, his magic, thoughtful, warmer" which reveal how suicide is skillful
in its work Sexton succeeds to introduce suicide in good appearance to push
the reader to commit suicide.
Some of Sexton's expressions clarify that she is drunken as in "a drug so
sweet", "my body at needle point", and "drooling at mouth-hole". Sexton is
one of the feminist poets, so she compares death to a female "she waits".
She also uses two expressions to confirm that suicide in her mind "lust"
and in her body's system "sad Bone". In this poem, Sexton gives death a big
effective role "undo an old wound", and "to empty my breath from its bad
prison". Consequently Sexton succeeds to prove her idea through her
significant words and indicative expressions.

Imagery
Sexton's images also help her language to present death as she sees. She
does not use a lot of kinds of figures of speech, but her images are
expressive as she uses

Metaphors in "I walk in my clothing", "eaten the enemy", and "empty my
breath".

(2, 11, 27)
In the first metaphor, she compares her clothes to a tunnel. In the
second one, she resembles the enemy as a food that she has eaten. In the
third one, she depicts her breath as a bottle that death will pour. Sexton
also uses a lot of
Personifications in
But suicides have a special language.
have possessed the enemy, eaten the enemy,
have taken on his craft, his magic.
Suicides have already betrayed the body.
Death's a sad Bone; bruised, you'd say,
and yet she waits for me, year after year,
to empty my breath from its bad prison.
Balanced there, suicides sometimes meet
(7, 11,
12, 18, 24, 25, 27, 31)

Sexton uses all these personifications to compare death to a human
being. She also uses
Simile in "But suicide have a special language like carpenters"

(7)
Sexton uses repetition to confirm the meaning.
Repetition in "have possessed the enemy, eaten the enemy", "year after
year".

(11, 25)
Musicality
Anne Sexton employs some alliterations, assonances, and sound pattern to
add music to the poem, for example
Alliteration in
Twice I have so simply declared myself,
but dazzled, they can't forget a drug so sweet
Death's a sad Bone; bruised, you'd say,
Balanced there, suicides sometimes meet

(10, 20, 24, 28)
Assonance in "warmer than oil or water".

(14)
Sound pattern in "have possessed the enemy, eaten the enemy".

(7)

Tone
Although the poem talks about Sexton's wish to die, the tone is optimistic.
In this poem, Sexton defends from death against life. Therefore she uses
optimistic words which make the poem very hopeful. This appears when she
praises suicides "have special languages", and "his magic". However, in the
last two stanzas the tone begins to transforms into hopeless tone because
suicide leaves Sexton without finishing his work "leaving the bread they
mistook for a kiss", and "leaving the page of the book carelessly open".



Form

"Wanting to die" is a short poem in free verse that divides its thirty
three lines into eleven tercets (three line stanza). The whole poem is an
answer of a question.


Conclusion

In "Wanting to die" Sexton notes that her body, her essential physical, is
only in a "bad prison" that should be emptied of breath to feel free.
Sexton ties to find her freedom through poetry. She wants to remove this
crucial and unnecessary prison by the help of death. Therefore her emphasis
in her third collection "Live or Die" is not upon confession with its
implication of guilt, but upon compassion for herself and for all those who
have influenced her personal existence. In this poem, Sexton failed again
to commit suicide, but this time was not the last attempt, because Sexton
really died by committing suicide by carbon monoxide poisoning in 1974.



yaso from Egypt
Comment 4 of 76, added on January 28th, 2006 at 9:12 PM.

I am doing a essay for my english class and this poem was the one that I
had picked. I was just so drawn to it. After reading a lot about anne
sexton I can see why she would write a poem like this. I mean I can see
what see has been going through. The poem was very moving to me I love it
so much. I also love many other poems that she wrote. They are all very
moving but this one was the best. At least what I think.

Love heather

heather from United States
Comment 3 of 76, added on June 7th, 2005 at 1:01 PM.

wow i love this poem as sad as it may be i know it is hurtful and true. our
world is feeled with so many people that feel this pain and sorrow and
think about this all day everyday this poem has touched me it shows me and
tells me that there are several people that feel this way and are going
through similar things that i am going through. Anne sexton is a great poet
or was and i admire all her poems im very greatful for this site it is
wonderful it has some of the greatest poets ever. thank you for this site
it has helped me in so many ways that i cant even explain thank you so
much
always
gabby ortega
a.k.a gabster

gabby da gabster from United States
Comment 2 of 76, added on April 14th, 2005 at 9:08 AM.

First let me thank you for this post. I too can relate as I believe most
of us can in some sort of way. I have suffered suicidal tendencies from
the age of twelve. For me, it was all due to an eye opening experience
with death, my first real experience and understanding of what death really
is. Watching another person die with your own eyes, a person you love
dearly is simply something that can never be forgot. In the process of
experiencing the event I can only assume it is natural to become
infactuated with the thought of death. So I did! Soon after, still at the
age of twelve I began experimenting and quickly found myself too struggling
through addiction. The addictions did nothing other than intensify my
desire to experience death and leave the pain of life behind. Needless to
say I aged past those years and overcame most of the addictions. However,
I quickly realized that the adult life and mind with thoughts of suicide
are much greater; serious and harder to comprehend than that of a child or
teenager. Now as an adult 27, I am full aware of the mental state I have
sustained myself to. I have sadly come to terms that my mential dementia
is nothing other than weakness within myself. Life nor the world around me
corrupted my mind, heart and soul. My mind, my thoughts, my pain is all to
blame. I did this to myself and I must suffer the consequences. That is
what has become so hard to understand. How could I allow myself to become
so mentaly weak that I can no longer control nor sustain my own mind! I
have become the greates enemy I will ever face just as we all must face our
inner selves. I fear the day my inner self comes forth for I know I shall
not attempt a battle. The battle has already been fought, you cannot beat
yourself at your own mental game! To this day I still ask God to forgive
life of the burden I have placed on it. So just as you two I also wish
this curse or blessing, which ever you believe upon myself. Though I too
truly do not want to die....however, the inevitable is going to happen. My
doctors have discovered an illness in me which is shortening my life span.
They have given me to sometime around fourty years old to live. This means
I am over half way through life as of now. This has to be the sickest
awakening I have ever experienced. For all those years I prayed and begged
for my day of death without a fear.....now I find myself terrified, scared
as if a child again facing the unknown of my own fate. When I wanted to
die I seemed to be at my strongest. Now that I am dying......I am by far
at my weakest and the scaredest I've ever been. I say this once again,
this is something I have done to myself. I wanted death so badly......I
destroyed my innerself (literally) to the point of no return. It's
important for everyone to understand what kind of damage the mind can do to
the body if you allow it. I allowed my mind to destroy my body from the
inside out. Sure, I could blame drugs and addictions in the past but deep
inside I know that my mind wanted death so badly it began raping my body of
the life it wanted to live. My body is now beyond return to a healthy
state. My mind........has strangly become healthy now that it has
destroyed my body. I now want life over death in my mind but my mind has
left my body no choice of life.

Thank you for allowing me to speak my mind. I hope someone out there
understands what I have said in response to the poem. Sometimes you go too
deep and there's no turning back!

Titus from United States
Comment 1 of 76, added on January 9th, 2005 at 1:49 AM.

Interesting poem. Undecidedly or possibly unwilling to critique; thus I
will not. However, I will say, thoughts of suicide have plagued me for
many years. My belief is that suicide occurs when the physical/emotional
self can no longer withstand the hopeless, worthless, traumatic and
torturous feelings or thoughts unwittingly bestowed upon the victim.
Simplistically, the "cons" out weigh the "pros." I've been at that place
many, many times. Not only major depression, I've battled major addiction,
namely alcoholism. Drinking to alleviate the depression. It never works;
just worsens it. I envy those who have never dealt with suicidal ideology;
it's simply unfair that some must endure this hell on earth. As mentioned
in the above poem, I too, have begged God to kill me or allow my death.
Matter of fact, last week I did just that. The irony is that I really do
not want to die, yet I cannot continue living within the confines of this
blackness and hurt. I've known several people who have committed suicide.
The latest was just 4 months ago; he was bi-polar. A 25 year old, recently
married, apparently successful....on the exterior. And, oddly enough, I had
an Uncle commit suicide a year and a half ago. His last name was Sexton.
He also had a history or addiction. Did not know him well, but did
understand his pain.

Thank you for allowing my comments.
BLB

B. L. Beasley from United States

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Information about Wanting to Die

Poet: Anne Sexton
Poem: Wanting to Die
Added: Feb 6 2004
Viewed: 1120 times
Poem of the Day: Dec 21 2000


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By: Anne Sexton

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