Poets | Bookstore | Poem of the Day | Top 40 | Search | Comments | Privacy
September 23rd, 2014 - we have 234 poets, 8,025 poems and 278,943 comments.
Wallace Stevens - Domination Of Black

At night, by the fire,
The colors of the bushes
And of the fallen leaves,
Repeating themselves,
Turned in the room,
Like the leaves themselves
Turning in the wind.
Yes: but the color of the heavy hemlocks
Came striding.
And I remembered the cry of the peacocks.

The colors of their tails
Were like the leaves themselves
Turning in the wind,
In the twilight wind.
They swept over the room,
Just as they flew from the boughs of the hemlocks
Down to the ground.
I heard them cry -- the peacocks.
Was it a cry against the twilight
Or against the leaves themselves
Turning in the wind,
Turning as the flames
Turned in the fire,
Turning as the tails of the peacocks
Turned in the loud fire,
Loud as the hemlocks
Full of the cry of the peacocks?
Or was it a cry against the hemlocks?

Out of the window,
I saw how the planets gathered
Like the leaves themselves
Turning in the wind.
I saw how the night came,
Came striding like the color of the heavy hemlocks
I felt afraid.
And I remembered the cry of the peacocks.

Share |

Added: Feb 20 2003 | Viewed: 28113 times | Comments and analysis of Domination Of Black by Wallace Stevens Comments (8)

Domination Of Black - Comments and Information

Poet: Wallace Stevens
Poem: Domination Of Black
Poem of the Day: Jul 27 2006

Comment 8 of 8, added on June 17th, 2013 at 3:10 PM.
Wonderful Site You Have Here!

I used to read a great deal of books but now I surf the internet looking for really good blogs like this one to read. this was a good read thanks!

Vedlinejada from Faroe Islands
Comment 7 of 8, added on June 17th, 2012 at 6:25 PM.
Domination of Black

Here is what this poem says to me. All is the same. Everything abstracted only slightly becomes like everything else. The poem distilled most simply is this. The bright red berry of the hemlock, surrounded by its leaves sparkling with firelight either in his room or from his room. The bright red center of the peacocks tail feather, surrounded by a swirl of iridescent color. The sun surrounded by a swirl of planets and stars in the dark sky. Wallace himself, a flash of color sitting before the brightness of the fire. All the same. So simple and sudden in his realization. And he felt afraid.

David from United States
Comment 6 of 8, added on June 17th, 2012 at 6:25 PM.
Domination of Black

Here is what this poem is says to me. All is the same. Everything abstracted only slightly becomes like everything else. The poem distilled most simply is this. The bright red berry of the hemlock, surrounded by its leaves sparkling with firelight either in his room or from his room. The bright red center of the peacocks tail feather, surrounded by a swirl of iridescent color. The sun surrounded by a swirl of planets and stars in the dark sky. Wallace himself, a flash of color sitting before the brightness of the fire. All the same. So simple and sudden in his realization. And he felt afraid.

David from United States

Are you looking for more information on this poem? Perhaps you are trying to analyze it? The poem, Domination Of Black, has received 8 comments. Click here to read them, and perhaps post a comment of your own.

Poem Info

Stevens Info
Copyright © 2000-2012 Gunnar Bengtsson. All Rights Reserved. Links | Bookstore