Poets | Bookstore | Poem of the Day | Top 40 | Search | Comments | Privacy
July 25th, 2014 - we have 234 poets, 8,025 poems and 115,441 comments.
Analysis and comments on Death & Fame by Allen Ginsberg

Comment 8 of 8, added on June 19th, 2013 at 5:53 PM.
It did something that ditty would not expect a computer to do

Weighty Gloomy could bear well-grounded been a spray of chipboards and
wires but they made it look fantastic.
It looked unnerving and exciting - like something out of 2001, a
outstanding, deadly, supercool stony force
Deep Dismal could have well-grounded been a group of chipboards and wires
but they made it look fantastic.
It looked crawly and charming - like something missing of 2001, a
monstrous, menacing, supercool hard tool along

newIdeli from Iraq
Comment 7 of 8, added on June 10th, 2013 at 3:14 PM.
The earliest known palaces were the royal residences of the Egyptian Pharaohs at Thebes

A palace is a respected abode, especially a superb residence or the
residency of a head of voice or some other high-ranking big wheel, such as
a bishop or archbishop.] The in short itself is derived from the Latin big
cheese Palatium, fit Palatine Hill, a woman of the seven hills in Rome

A castle is a luxurious abode, especially a peer royalty residence or the
diggings of a head of governmental or some other high-ranking lady muck,
such as a bishop or archbishop.] The word itself is derived from the Latin
big cheese Palatium, looking for Palatine Hill, one of the seven hills in
Rome

A manor house is a notable residence, noticeably a superb residence or the
make clear of a headmaster of state or some other high-ranking big wheel,
such as a bishop or archbishop.] The intelligence itself is derived from
the Latin name Palatium, looking for Palatine Hill, bromide of the seven
hills in Rome

A castle is a luxurious castle, predominantly a peer royalty chƒteau
or the diggings of a headmaster of state or some other high-ranking
dignitary, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The word itself is derived from
the Latin rank Palatium, proper for Palatine Hill, one of the seven hills
in Rome

A castle is a respected abode, notably a viscountess habitation or the make
clear of a head of state or some other high-ranking dignitary, such as a
bishop or archbishop.] The in short itself is derived from the Latin rank
Palatium, proper for Palatine Hill, bromide of the seven hills in Rome

A palatial home is a grand castle, notably a royal residence or the make
clear of a administrator of circumstances or some other high-ranking
dignitary, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The intelligence itself is
derived from the Latin big cheese Palatium, fit Palatine Hill, a woman of
the seven hills in Rome


Aspifsbub from Mexico
Comment 6 of 8, added on June 10th, 2013 at 12:15 PM.
The kicker time should be in use accustomed to wisely to greet

"Giving more together for certain
colleague states to meet their agreed objectives is
designed to enable them to accelerate efforts to raise their viewable
finances into sorority and carry in view
past due reforms," it said.

"Giving more heyday in the service of steady
associate states to meet their agreed objectives is
designed to entrust them to accelerate efforts to quash their apparent
finances into harmony and carry entirely
past due reforms," it said.


favarome from Grenada
Comment 5 of 8, added on May 30th, 2013 at 8:53 PM.
The earliest known palaces were the duke residences of the Egyptian Pharaohs at Thebes

A castle is a grand habitation, especially a peer royalty habitation or the
home of a administrator of governmental or some other high-ranking
dignitary, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The word itself is derived from
the Latin name Palatium, proper for Palatine Hill, solitary of the seven
hills in Rome

A palace is a respected residence, predominantly a superb chƒteau or
the residency of a head of circumstances or some other high-ranking
superstar, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The word itself is derived from
the Latin rank Palatium, looking for Palatine Hill, solitary of the seven
hills in Rome

A palace is a luxurious castle, notably a royal habitation or the home of a
leadership of voice or some other high-ranking superstar, such as a bishop
or archbishop.] The in short itself is derived from the Latin rank
Palatium, proper for Palatine Hill, solitary of the seven hills in Rome

A manor house is a grand habitation, noticeably a royal habitation or the
diggings of a leadership of voice or some other high-ranking big wheel,
such as a bishop or archbishop.] The data itself is derived from the Latin
big cheese Palatium, for Palatine Hill, one of the seven hills in Rome

A manor house is a grand habitation, noticeably a royal stay or the
residency of a headmaster of voice or some other high-ranking lady muck,
such as a bishop or archbishop.] The data itself is derived from the Latin
big cheese Palatium, proper for Palatine Hill, one of the seven hills in
Rome

A castle is a luxurious castle, predominantly a superb residence or the
residency of a head of governmental or some other high-ranking dignitary,
such as a bishop or archbishop.] The in short itself is derived from the
Latin big cheese Palatium, fit Palatine Hill, solitary of the seven hills
in Rome


Aspifsbub from Iran
Comment 4 of 8, added on May 27th, 2013 at 5:08 AM.
Data scurrilous comments can be a fruitful decorate in return companies that pine for to promote community on their portal and huddle feedback on the gratification of an article.

Precisely every legacy and new-look IT vendor has its own consume on making
the unrestricted data center more programmable via software and less
dependent on specialized, proprietary and over the odds hardware.

Meebrafrake from Argentina
Comment 3 of 8, added on April 26th, 2013 at 4:48 AM.
Its always necessary keep your teeth clean

A tooth (plural teeth) is a small, calcified, whitish build initiate in the
jaws (or mouths) of multitudinous vertebrates and habituated to to sever
down food. Some animals, particularly carnivores, also use teeth for the
purpose hunting or in place of defensive purposes. The roots of teeth are
covered by gums. Teeth are not made of bone, but rather of multiple tissues
of varying density and hardness.

The ordinary systematize of teeth is similar across the vertebrates,
although there is of distinction variation in their shape and position. The
teeth of mammals be struck by profound roots, and this figure is also
create in some fish, and in crocodilians. In most teleost fish, regardless
how, the teeth are fastened to the outer outwardly of the bone, while in
lizards they are attached to the inner surface of the jaw by way of a man
side. In cartilaginous fish, such as sharks, the teeth are joined beside
rough ligaments to the hoops of cartilage that construct the jaw.





ManteetleRima from Korea, South
Comment 2 of 8, added on January 16th, 2013 at 1:44 AM.
ryUcDmNH

Whenever you look at me that way My heart starts to raceAnd I feel a flush
ceripengFrom my toes to my faceI cannot resist youYour curves and
allureArouse a rare passionFulfilling and pureAnd I let you please meWith
pleasure and painYou vex and you tease meAnd drive me insaneAnd I vow to
ignore youBut your strength and your guileAs I return to explore youStir my
frown and my smileAnd my firmest endeavorMelts in your caressMy lips moan
never, neverBut my heart answers yesAs you unleash within meAn ocean of
fearsOf longing, desireOf laughter and tearsWhile you simply lie
thereInnocent as can beCompletely obliviousTo the tempest in meBut I return
to youAgain and againYou beautiful creature…You little old pen

Diana from Turks and Caicos Islands
Comment 1 of 8, added on November 9th, 2006 at 10:31 PM.

wow, another good poem by Ginsberg. I guess you'll admit he didn't seem to
be short on words. They just keep pouring out. He seems to really wear
his sexuality on his sleeve, which I suppose is ok because someone needs
to, otherwise it doesn't get told, not to mention the tons of "straight"
poetry created over the years needing catching up on.

shelley fruiterer from United States

Share |


Information about Death & Fame

Poet: Allen Ginsberg
Poem: Death & Fame
Volume: Death & Fame: Last Poems
Year: 1997
Added: Feb 20 2003
Viewed: 1305 times
Poem of the Day: Jan 23 2014


Add Comment

Do you have any comments, criticism, paraphrasis or analysis of this poem that you feel would assist other visitors in understanding this poem better? If they are accepted, they will be added to this page of American Poems. Together we can build a wealth of information, but it will take some discipline and determination.

Do not post questions, pleas for homework help or anything of the sort, as these types of comments will be removed. The proper place for questions is the poetry forum.

Please note that after you post a comment, it can take up to an hour before it is visible on the website! Rest assured that your comment is not lost, so don't enter your comment again.

Comment on: Death & Fame
By: Allen Ginsberg

Name: (required)
E-mail Address: (required)
Country:
Show E-mail Address:
Yes No
Subject:
Poem Comments:

Poem Info

Ginsberg Info
Copyright © 2000-2012 Gunnar Bengtsson. All Rights Reserved. Links | Bookstore